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Delivery format query

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chris brett
Delivery format query
on Aug 20, 2013 at 11:56:34 am

Hi

----- wondering what everyone is using for delivery format when sending uncompressed interlaced PAL widescreen ?

--- am still using sequential tga files with seperate audio and wondering if theres anything better / less bulky ?

---- anyone care to comment on PNG files please - which I tend to use for RGBA export as I think they give a better result.


Chris Brett


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Roland R. Kahlenberg
Re: Delivery format query
on Aug 20, 2013 at 1:58:58 pm

A delivery format should be based on the delivery platform or device. IOW, it all depends on the client.

If it's for archival then there are more options available. QuickTime with the PNG CODEC is nice but for wider compatibility across applications and platforms, an image sequence is preferred.

HTH
RoRK

Intensive mocha & AE Training in Singapore and Other Dangerous Locations

Imagineer Systems (mocha) Certified Instructor
& Adobe After Effects CS6 ACE/ACI


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chris brett
Re: Delivery format query
on Aug 20, 2013 at 2:11:43 pm

Hi Roland

-- thanks for speedy feedback -- much appreciated

I get that it depends on the client but often as long as it loads into the Avid and looks good it does not matter ... so I was just wondering....

--- currently tending to stick with the tga sequence as it seems pretty ok all round.

-----------------------chris --


===========================================================


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Walter Soyka
Re: Delivery format query
on Aug 20, 2013 at 2:15:27 pm

[chris brett] "I get that it depends on the client but often as long as it loads into the Avid and looks good it does not matter ... so I was just wondering.."

You might consider delivering DNxHD (Avid's native lightly-compressed format). It even supports alpha.

You could talk with your editor and find out what they're using.

Walter Soyka
Principal & Designer at Keen Live
Motion Graphics, Widescreen Events, Presentation Design, and Consulting
RenderBreak Blog - What I'm thinking when my workstation's thinking
Creative Cow Forum Host: Live & Stage Events


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Walter Soyka
Re: Delivery format query
on Aug 20, 2013 at 2:13:48 pm

[chris brett] "wondering what everyone is using for delivery format when sending uncompressed interlaced PAL widescreen ?"

I provide whatever format works best for the recipient. If they haven't specified, I ask. I like to be easy to work with.


[chris brett] "am still using sequential tga files with seperate audio and wondering if theres anything better / less bulky ?"

[chris brett] "anyone care to comment on PNG files please - which I tend to use for RGBA export as I think they give a better result."

There is a distinction between lossless and uncompressed. Lossless means that no loss of information occurs during encoding or decoding; frames from the output are mathematically identical the pre-encoded frames. Uncompressed means that no attempt has been made to mathematically reduce the size of the output stream.

Lossless does not imply uncompressed, nor does uncompressed imply lossless.

The ZIP format, for example, is compressed and lossless. The ZIP file on disk is generally smaller than its source, but when you unzip a file, you get the exact original back. ZIP achieves its compression by finding and reducing redundancies in data in such a way that they can be perfectly restored.

The JPEG format is compressed and lossy. The file on disk uses less memory than the original frame, but when you decode a JPEG, you do not get the exact mathematical original back. JPEG achieves its compression by throwing away "visually unimportant" information. Once its gone, it cannot be recovered.

Uncompressed 4:2:2 video is uncompressed, but lossy. When the chroma subsampling is performed, some color information is irretrievably thrown away. The resulting stream is then encoded, but not compressed.

On TGA vs PNG: they are both lossless for 8-bit encodes. TGA may be 24 bits per pixel or 32 bits per pixel -- in other words, RGB or RGBA. TGA may optionally use run-length encoding (RLE) for compression.

RLE is a very simple compression scheme, and it works very well for areas of flat color. Basically, when a value is repeated sequentially, you only store the value once along with its number of repetitions.

For example:
1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 becomes
1 2(9) 3

Visually, for areas of flat color, this is great! However, without flat color, you won't get any compression benefit:

1 2 3 2 3 2 3 2 3 2 3 remains
1 2 3 2 3 2 3 2 3 2 3

because there are no runs to encode.

PNG uses the "DEFLATE" compression scheme also used in ZIP compression. PNG is thus able to compress areas of non-flat color, but it requires a bit more CPU use. PNG sequences also are capable of storing 16bpc with alpha (Trillions of Colors+).

That all got a bit long, but the bottom line is this:

For 8-bit projects, TGA and PNG will give you the same image quality. TGA files may be smaller for flat, cartoonish graphics, and PNG will nearly certainly be smaller for more nuanced or photographic content. TGA will be lossy for 16-bit projects, because it is an 8-bit-only format. PNG would be preferable here.

Walter Soyka
Principal & Designer at Keen Live
Motion Graphics, Widescreen Events, Presentation Design, and Consulting
RenderBreak Blog - What I'm thinking when my workstation's thinking
Creative Cow Forum Host: Live & Stage Events


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chris brett
Re: Delivery format query
on Aug 20, 2013 at 2:38:21 pm

Hi Walter

----- many thanks the more detailed info which is extremely useful and much appreciated.

Been wondering about swapping to PNG sequences anyway so will give it a try.

All the best

Chris Brett


==============================================================


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Cassius Marques
Re: Delivery format query
on Aug 20, 2013 at 4:54:52 pm

Very well explained Walter! I usually do know this kind of things when I take the time to think of it. But rarely we see all the nuances consistently put into words.


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