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Which will be the best cloud storage services in United States.

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Sam Alex
Which will be the best cloud storage services in United States.
on Oct 15, 2015 at 7:24:30 am

Hi all,
I am in search of some cloud backup services in United States to store my personal data, that involves various types of media files. I had an external hard drive to keep my personal files but recently its board got crashed and I lost a large amount of data. But fortunately I could recover the data with the help of my friend. I don’t want to take that risk any more that is why I am looking for an online storage. It would have more better if I can access the data from anywhere with any devices such as mobiles tablets etc. Can anybody tell me which cloud option suits me best for my requirements. and also where can I get such services.
Thank you.


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David Roth Weiss
Re: Which will be the best cloud storage services in United States.
on Oct 15, 2015 at 3:54:31 pm

Many of the companies offering cloud storage commercially are simply providing the front end (software interface) for the big guys like Amazon, Google, Apple, etc. So, it's very tough for smaller non-enterprise customers to determine what services their actually getting for their money, and if those service providers with the best prices will actually survive in the marketplace, and what that would mean the subscriber.

So, you're venturing into an arena that's easy to navigate for big enterprise level companies, as they can afford the biggest, most secure, and in many cases, the most expensive cloud storage from the big guys, who give them big discounts. Those companies are just too expensive for most small companies and individuals, forcing them to go to the innumerable smaller consolidators, that get swallowed-up by the competition all the time.
So, until the whole cloud thing becomes more mature, the little guys, like most of us, had best beware.

David Roth Weiss
Director/Editor/Colorist & Workflow Consultant
David Weiss Productions
Los Angeles


David is a Creative COW contributing editor and a forum host of the Apple Final Cut Pro forum.


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Bob Zelin
Re: Which will be the best cloud storage services in United States.
on Oct 15, 2015 at 9:57:37 pm

I know the answer -
NONE.
But there is an answer, which does correspond to this forum.
stop being a lazy ass and BACK UP YOUR FILES, and make this a part of your life. I don't care if it's on DVD, hard drive, LTO, or something, but stop relying on other people to make your life worthwhile and safe. You can backup your own files, and keep them safe - much more secure than any cloud site.

Let me be clear about this. Backing up your files - particularly your financial information - is more important than seeing your mother/father/wife/child in the hospital when they are critically ill. Because when you get killed in a car accident on the way to visit them in the hospital, and then your files for whatever reason are GONE, then they are left with nothing. Which means that you just screwed over your entire family. So there is NOTHING IN LIFE more important than backing up your files.

With that said, the best cloud service in the entire world is at the mercy of your local cable provider. So unless you are willing to move to Kansas City or Austin Texas where you can have a true fiber connection from Google, instead of the horrible service that both you and I both have, there is no "best cloud service in the United States". Want the best cloud service - move !

Bob Zelin

Bob Zelin
Rescue 1, Inc.
bobzelin@icloud.com


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David Roth Weiss
Re: Which will be the best cloud storage services in United States.
on Oct 15, 2015 at 10:15:15 pm

I agree with Bob 100%...

The Cloud and Cloud Storage will EVENTUALLY be ready for primetime for ALL of us, big and small, rich and not so rich. But for now, unless you can afford to lease long-haul Dark Fiber, which is and will continue to be VERY EXPENSIVE for the foreseeable future, do what Bob says, and setup a realistic, inexpensive backup system. Or better yet, adopt the storage system often referred to as "Best Practices," which is a 3-tiered storage system that includes online (fast, disk-based), nearline (not so fast, disk-based), and archive (preferably LTO Tape).

David Roth Weiss
Director/Editor/Colorist & Workflow Consultant
David Weiss Productions
Los Angeles


David is a Creative COW contributing editor and a forum host of the Apple Final Cut Pro forum.


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Tim Wilson
Re: Which will be the best cloud storage services in United States.
on Oct 15, 2015 at 10:55:38 pm

I have a 1 TB pocket drive with some odds and ends. Music, video, various doo-dads I've downloaded over the years. Little USB 3, bus-powered thing you can rest in the palm of your hand. I got it free with a copy of MSFT Office.

Works great, but it failed to mount recently - new cable, problem solved! Woo-hoo!

But it made me think, wow, might be time to migrate to Dropbox or something. My db holds 2 TB, my files are maybe 600 gigs, so let's go for it.

I figured that I should do it in pieces so that I didn't choke my bandwidth. Well, I've got a pretty decent 20 megs up....but even if you leave Dropbox unthrottled, you get somewhere between 600 kb- 1 mb. You can do the math. I was looking at roughly a MONTH.

No kidding. A MONTH.

I looked around to make sure I wasn't do something wrong and nope, that's about right. And Dropbox is FASTER than some solutions.

Folks like Signiant really will shock you with how much faster they are than FTP or any of this other nonsense. It's so fast it looks like a mistake. "How can it possibly be ALL my files in so little time?"

But that's TRASFERRING files from one place to another. AFAIK there's not a way to "Signiant" something to just be parked to a cloud service. Very simply, none of those guys is optimized to either receive or serve your content in anything resembling a reasonable time.

So what am I doing instead? Spending $75 or $80 to have my 600 gigs of nonsense files on another teensy 1TB drive.

If you need to back up your phone, some Word files and Excel spreadsheets, some project files WITHOUT media, some finished clips for client approval....the cloud is fine. Anything bigger than that, anything is better. ANYTHING.


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Walter Soyka
Re: Which will be the best cloud storage services in United States.
on Oct 22, 2015 at 12:23:43 pm

[Tim Wilson] "But it made me think, wow, might be time to migrate to Dropbox or something. My db holds 2 TB, my files are maybe 600 gigs, so let's go for it... I was looking at roughly a MONTH. No kidding. A MONTH."

The best time to plant a tree was twenty years ago. The second best time to plant a tree is today.

I love everything about Dropbox. The collaboration with others, the syncing across my own machines (and the way it can turn any new computer into "my machine"), the ability to share an important file with someone at any time from my phone.

Here's to things worth waiting for.

Walter "2.96 TB on Dropbox" Soyka

Walter Soyka
Designer & Mad Scientist at Keen Live [link]
Motion Graphics, Widescreen Events, Presentation Design, and Consulting
@keenlive [twitter]   |   RenderBreak [blog]   |   Profile [LinkedIn]


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Tim Wilson
Re: Which will be the best cloud storage services in United States.
on Oct 23, 2015 at 12:13:10 am
Last Edited By Tim Wilson on Oct 23, 2015 at 12:35:47 am

The first thing I have to say is that I adore Dropbox. Adore it.

I know I was an early adopter, so I just looked it up - I joined in the first month. (I had no idea that it was only September 2008. It has been so much a part of my everyday life that I thought it was much longer than that.)

I honestly can't imagine doing without it, or using anything else, which is why I'm frustrated right now.


[Walter Soyka] "The best time to plant a tree was twenty years ago. The second best time to plant a tree is today."

You know how long it takes to plant a tree? Like, an hour. LOL If I have a big one, it might take me a half day to rent a backhoe, plant the tree, and return the backhoe.

Or, the way it actually works, I pay a guy, and don't spend ANY time...yet I have a yard full of trees. LOL

I get what you're saying, Walter, but my issues with taking a month aren't just conceptual. One is, I'm only guessing that it's a month. The more files that went online, the longer Dropbox's estimate was becoming. The estimate of a month is when I pulled the plug.

Another is that I'm using my home network. My wife, like me, also works remotely, so we rely on a certain level of network performance just to do our jobs -- and the one month+ estimate Dropbox was giving me was based on using Dropbox's unthrottled speed. If I was using the "stay out of the way of other network traffic" setting, it would surely be taking a couple of months.

Uhm, no. Soooo much easier to buy a couple of $80 1TB drives for multiple redundancy.


Anyway, In looking at Dropbox user forums, this is by far the most common complaint. (Turns out that forums are a great source of information about what are other users are experiencing. Who knew? LOL) Like me, the overwhelming consensus is that it didn't used to be this bad. It has only been the last 18-24 months that it got this bad, currently topping out at just under 1mb/sec. This is virtually universally reported.

(Admittedly, you can do a little better than that using the web interface, but that one's limited to 3000 files, which isn't enough. And you can't do THAT much better, and you can't see what's going on, because Dropbox copies over the directory structure before the actual files - of course -- meaning that if the transfer is interrupted that you have to open every folder to see where you've stopped before you can load up the next batch of files because it can't handle transferring the number of files you have. Excruciating.)

Certainly in the past, I was completely okay with Dropbox upload speeds. The COW's original Dropbox was massive, and none of us had any issues with how quickly it was populated.


I still LOVE Dropbox. Other than program files, I have literally not one single local-only file on any of my computers OR my phone. I even have a junk "I'll deal with it later" pile called Desktop-X -- so even the unsorted crap that I used to leave on my local desktop is now on Dropbox!

And thanks to Adobe, not even all my application files are local-only. Frankly, I'm going that way with MSFT Ofc on my next computer. I'd rather not have ANYTHING local-only, and am moving in that direction as quickly as I can.

Seeing how well it has worked for me, my wife has also moved her company onto Dropbox.

The one issue she's found is one I've found too, and seen others mention in the DB forums, for people who are quite capable at their jobs, but not super technically-oriented: people don't understand that the files are BOTH local AND on the network. They try to exclusively use the web interface, or refuse to use it at all because of "security issues" (uhm, no), or fear that someone is looking at their computer, or some other nonsense that grinds collaboration to a halt...

...but that's user misunderstanding. Maybe it could be addressed if team leaders or Dropbox owners could rename the local folder (name it after the company or something) and say to everyone else, "You see this folder in your Documents folder that has the company name on it? Put everything there. And don't be surprised to see some stuff in there that you didn't put there. We've all got that same folder on our own computers, and we're all contributing to it -- but don't worry, none of us can see what's on each other's computer unless we invite them to see it."

Something like that. Leave the internet out of it, and ideally, leave the word "Dropbox" out of it.

Again, I love Dropbox, but it's still not feasible for me to transfer a couple of hundred gigs in under a couple of months from what I can see.



PS. It's also a little complicated for me because I don't have enough free space on my local HD, which is rather considerably smaller than what I need to transfer. (I'm a laptop-only guy, and because of Dropbox, 256GB has been more than enough space.)

I'm fine with the Sync Selected Folders feature to manage local space -- the one power feature I most regularly point out to people -- but that only works with what's already up.

To load files that I don't have room for on my internal drive, I have to move the Dropbox local folder to an external drive, upload the files, turn off syncing for that folder, then remove those folders from my local external drive, then move my Dropbox back to its original place on my internal drive.

Not rocket science by any means, but a rock just big enough to get in the way of me planting the tree there right now.


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