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dan stevers
DVX and greenscreening
on Feb 24, 2008 at 8:45:24 pm

I'm going to be using my DVX100b to shoot some greenscreen footage, capturing with Premiere, and compositing with After Effects. Do you have any recommendation for the camera settings to achieve the best results? I'm wondering about the options in the scene file menu. I will be shooting in progressive mode. Also, I am comfortable lighting the screen and subject so that shouldn't be a problem.

Thanks.


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Noah Kadner
Re: DVX and greenscreening
on Feb 26, 2008 at 6:34:11 am

24pA, detail not too strong. Edit at 23.98

Unlock the secrets of the DVX100, HVX200 and Apple Color. Now featuring the HD Survival Guide!
http://www.callboxlive.com



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dan stevers
Re: DVX and greenscreening
on Feb 27, 2008 at 5:54:37 am

So why is it that most people say that 24a is better than 30p for greenscreen? I'm curious. And when I interface between premiere and after effects, is there anything to keep in mind if I shoot in 24a? Thanks again.



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Dave LaRonde
Re: DVX and greenscreening
on Feb 28, 2008 at 7:57:19 pm

[dan stevers] "So why is it that most people say that 24a is better than 30p for greenscreen?"

Because there are six fewer frames to render per second. There are no differences in color reproduction nor in resolution between the two frame rates. It's still just DV.



"....when I interface between premiere and after effects, is there anything to keep in mind if I shoot in 24a?"

Remove the pulldown before you key. Remove it as you capture it, if you can.

If you've never tried keying DV video before, I recommend watching a podcast by Alex Lindsay, the founder of DV Garage and Pixel Corps, called "The Road to 1080p Part 2".
In it you will find an excellent description of the differences between 4-4-4, 4-2-2 and 4-1-1 color resolution, and you will come to understand the challenges of keying DV. It's WELL worth the 15 minutes it takes to watch.

You can get the podcast here: http://macbreak.libsyn.com/index.php?post_id=70596

As you watch if, keep in mind that Alex Lindsay runs a company that makes DV chroma keying plugins.

If you're going to use AE, you probably have Keylight in mind as a keying tool. Keylight likes a less light on the green screen than other keyers. The usual admonitions about even lighting and the distance of the subject from the background apply.

Access to a waveform monitor can be a GREAT help. If the brightest highlights on the subject come in at 100 IRE units, the background should be about 45 IRE units. The waveform of the green screen should be a thin, level line at 45: the thinness of the line indicates even lighting top to bottom, and a level line indicates even lighting side to side.

You can accomplish the same thing by measuring footcandles with an incident light meter. Even though its much more time-consuming, it can really help when the time comes to key.

And if you find that Keylight just doesn't cut it, you might want to look into a new product by DV Garage called Conduit, which brings nodal compositing to After Effects. I am told it does a better keying job than DV Garage's previous best keyer, DV Matte Pro.

And whatever keyer you use, don't expect to get a clean key with a couple of clicks and a few tweaks. You're working with DV, which uses just about the worst color resolution there is. Oh, it's good enought to fool the human eye, but computers are a lot more discriminating.

Dave LaRonde
Sr. Promotion Producer
KCRG-TV


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