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Over Cranking shutter speeds Optimal

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Adam Kitter
Over Cranking shutter speeds Optimal
on Mar 25, 2011 at 4:56:48 pm

I am planning on shooting some footage over cranked 720P 60fps (progressive not interlaced) and the final project will be on a 24p timeline. I have been doing some test shots using various shutter speeds, and haven't found enough evidence to support a final decision. I have read that some people say a higher shutter speed is better but I found that when slowed down the footage looks a little choppy and I want a smooth slo mo, with minimal motion blur.

I also suspect that my workflow may be to blame for this. At present time I import my footage into cinema tools and conform the 60P to 24p then use the conformed footage in my 24p timeline. I have seen that a lot of people use a variety of plug ins and other software to slow down their footage, but I like the cinema tools route the best so far.

Any tips would be greatly appreciated


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gary adcock
Re: Over Cranking shutter speeds Optimal
on Mar 25, 2011 at 5:48:01 pm

[Adam Kitter] "At present time I import my footage into cinema tools and conform the 60P to 24p then use the conformed footage in my 24p timeline."

That would not be the best way, you are actually loosing many of the benefits of working within the confines of "off-speed" as most of the capability of manipulating time lies within the camera itself.

Are you shooting with a camera that supports VFR (variable frame rate) recording? A number of the 720p camera do support some level of shooting in this manner, Panasonic being the leader with cameras as far back as the first Varicams. Now most Prosumer level and above cameras allow you to shoot 720p specifically to be played back slower or faster than it was originally recorded, as Sony does in the EX and F3 series cameras.

You are turning your entire clip into slow mo via brute force, where as working off-speed and making it look right require that you think about things like shutter angle and DoF, as the higher frame rates needed to slow the motion down (your 59.94 / 23.976 conversion is a mild 2.5x speed increase) also increase the need for more light and different shutter angles maybe required,

Working In-camera also allows for dynamic speed ramps during the shot something needed for highest quality of image or if you are outputting to a live broadcast.

gary adcock
Studio37

Post and Production Workflow Consultant
Production and Post Stereographer
Chicago, IL

http://blogs.creativecow.net/24640



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Adam Kitter
Re: Over Cranking shutter speeds Optimal
on Mar 25, 2011 at 7:32:04 pm

Gary, I shoot on the Panasonic HVX200 @ 720P 60fps. What would you recommend as a workflow for optimal slow motion. Also I mentioned I have been doing tests for shutter speed but haven't found the best.


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Steve Eisen
Re: Over Cranking shutter speeds Optimal
on Mar 26, 2011 at 5:21:35 am

Place your camera in Film Mode and choose 720/24pn for your Record Mode. Change your frame rate to achieve your desired motion. 60 will give you the slowest motion and 48 will be 50%. Don't mess with your shutter speed.

Steve Eisen
Eisen Video Productions
Vice President
Chicago Final Cut Pro Users Group


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Jurgen Hoppe
Re: Over Cranking shutter speeds Optimal
on Mar 26, 2011 at 1:01:12 pm

Obviously there is no general rule. We agree with many pros that best results for 720/60 is a shutter speed of 1/120.


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Adam Kitter
Re: Over Cranking shutter speeds Optimal
on Mar 28, 2011 at 8:37:07 pm

Thank all for your tips, I ended up finding out that using the syncro scan @ 180.0 db and that seems that have been the best looking results, for the HVX.

So yes Shot @ 720P 60 now I need to figure out what the best workflow is to conform to 24fps. I mentioned I usually use cinema tools but have heard there may be a better way??? any help?


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