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no hope for PBS acquisition with HPX370 footage?

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Philip Fass
no hope for PBS acquisition with HPX370 footage?
on Dec 30, 2010 at 12:59:00 pm

Looks like there's no hope of PBS acquiring a video shot on an HPX370, according to this document:

http://www.pbs.org/producers/TOS-1-2010-Submission-to-PBS.pdf

Basic problem is that chip has to be at least 1/2 inch. Any thoughts to the contrary? Thanks.


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David Jones
Re: no hope for PBS acquisition with HPX370 footage?
on Dec 30, 2010 at 3:26:52 pm

That's interesting; I see they updated it. They also require that film must be at least 35mm; no super-16?

Dave J


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Dan Brockett
Re: no hope for PBS acquisition with HPX370 footage?
on Dec 30, 2010 at 5:26:28 pm

Philip:

It only matters if PBS commissions you. Is PBS knocking at your door to commission a series or one off? If you shoot a show on spec on the 370 and PBS is interested, they will purchase it.

Same with all of the cable networks, their tech specs are merely barriers to entry, they all buy programming all of the time that is shot on cameras that spec out lower than their technical requirements. Many Discovery Network programs are shot on out of spec cameras.

I've never understood the concern over this, if a cable net or PBS commissions a series or one-off from you, you build camera purchase or rental into the budget and use what they require. If you are hopeful dreamer and hope that a cable net or PBS will purchase whatever programming you are producing, you shoot on whatever you want and if it good enough, they may buy it, regardless of what it was shot on.

I shot two PBS specials in the past two years, both on the Panasonic AG-HPX170, which is technically out of spec for PBS. Both aired on PBS nationally with no rejections and no issues, they looked great. The producer has a connection at a big PBS outlet back east, they buy the shows and air them on their outlet and make them available to all PBS outlets nationally, we were picked up all over the country for the national fundraising drive this year.

99% of people who worry about these specs have little chance of their work ever airing on PBS. If you shoot something on your own and sell it to them, they aren't going to care what it was shot on. If they commission you, you are required to meet their technical specs. End of story.

Cheers,

Dan

A Producer Who Is Also A DP? Yep, that's Me.

http://www.danbrockett.com


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Philip Fass
Re: no hope for PBS acquisition with HPX370 footage?
on Dec 30, 2010 at 6:18:04 pm

Thank you, Dan. That's good info. It's on spec, and more likely to be considered by our local PBS station than nationally. But you never know, the non-profit I'm doing it for has good connections in D.C.



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Shane Ross
Re: no hope for PBS acquisition with HPX370 footage?
on Dec 30, 2010 at 6:36:57 pm

They want higher quality production, yet they pay less and less. And most of their shows are still booooooring!

They need to wake up. STORY IS KING...chips are secondary.

Shane

GETTING ORGANIZED WITH FINAL CUT PRO DVD...don't miss it.
Read my blog, Little Frog in High Def


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Dan Brockett
Re: no hope for PBS acquisition with HPX370 footage?
on Dec 30, 2010 at 9:01:24 pm

I agree Shane. The more films and television programming I shoot on my AG-HPX170, the more I realize that. I shot a feature film last year on the 170 that premiered in Copenhagen at the IMAX Theater last December. It looked really quite great on the curved IMAX screen through their 4K data projector.

Do larger sensor video cams, RED and Alexa look better? Of course, but who cares? The story, writing and acting are so much more important than which stupid format you are using. I also find it interesting that one of my favorite shows ever on television, Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations, is shot on cheap, way out of date HDV cameras.

Just goes to prove that story trumps all and even the lowliest cameras can produce killer footage if you know what you are doing as a DP and if you have a great editor/colorist at the other end of the pipe. No Reservations took the Emmy for best Cinematography for a non-fiction show in 2009, I love it.

Too many techno nerds in our business that only care about resolution and shooting on the "best" when that really should be about #5 on the list of what makes a compelling film or TV project. Write a great script, pay your actors and crew, great sets, wardrobe, hair, makeup, lighting, cinematography are so much more important than shooting 4K, 35mm film, etc.

Dan

A Producer Who Is Also A DP? Yep, that's Me.

http://www.danbrockett.com


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Peter Sarro
Re: no hope for PBS acquisition with HPX370 footage?
on Mar 21, 2011 at 10:37:04 pm

Guys please bear with me for a second: I did a search on 'why buy an HPX370' and your comments came up which I found very interesting in light (no pun intended) of the many good things I've read about the HPX370. While I realize the comments are directed to the PBS specs and the HPX370 my reason for doing the search on "why buy an HPX370" relates to reading a number of reviews on the cam, Shane's review is one of them along with his great footage that I saw and found to be really good. My question is going to sound newbie like and dumb, but, obviously if money were not an issue, choosing between the HPX370 and say the AG-HMC80 I would imagine would be no-brainer: The two cams are in a different class altogether. I personally have never shot anything similar to what you guys have in terms of appearing on PBS or a similar venue so can you shed some light on why you would select the HPX370 as opposed to the AGHMC80? Thank you.


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