FORUMS: list search recent posts

video and flash

COW Forums : Adobe Flash

<< PREVIOUS   •   FAQ   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
Tom Hepburn
video and flash
on Jul 28, 2008 at 8:11:06 pm

Hello,

I'm trying to create video that has a person interacting with some graphics. My plan was to shoot on a blue/green screen to key out the background and then bring it in to Flash to have the subject interact with the graphical elements.
I've done this a lot with AfterEffects, but obviously this is going to be different.
How would the audio work with this. I've read that long video brought into flash can have sync issues. This would be a problem as this subject would be narrating.

Am I better off just making a quicktime movie and compressing it in flash (FLV)? Or to save on file size/load time would it be better to import the subject (with the transparent background) and animate things there (in flash). The end file being a swf.

Any help would be appreciated as I'm in uncharted territory here. I've looked at some of the videos here, but haven't found one that does what I want to do. Maybe I'm looking in the wrong place?

Thanks in advance,
Tom


Return to posts index

Sam Mattern
Re: video and flash
on Jul 30, 2008 at 1:47:20 pm

Tom,

In my experience, creating a MOV then compressing to FLV will give you much better results. I've embedded video in SWF's before, and you run into all sorts of weird issues. The first is you have to make sure to see the Scene's properties to 30 fps, since it essentially embeds the movie on the timeline. That being said, I've noticed that the video plays back at different speeds on different machines (not by a lot) based on how fast the computer can process the frames. To top it all off, you would have to build some custom playback controls that would be frame based.

Creating the FLV gives you lots of great options. You can set how much you would like to buffer before playback, it's easy to create a custom playback holder and controls (or you can use any of flash's playback controlers), and it's all based in milliseconds (much easier than frames). There's considerably more built-in functionality if you go this route. I suggest watching the Flash Video Basics tutorials on here created by Lee Brimelow.

If you want to cue animations to parts in the narrations, you just create an interval checking the current playback time against a list of times when you want stuff to happen. Example:

setInterval( animationFunc, 100 );
function animationFunc():Void{
if( ns.time >= 1000 && ns.time <=1500 ){
//play a certain animation
}
}
This checks ten times a second to see if the current playback time falls between 1 and 1.5 seconds into the movie. You would want to use a half of a second area to cue it from, OR increase the frequecy that you detect the current time (setInterval( animationFunc,10 )). It's important to note, however, that you should still use a range of times, or use the Math.round(ns.time), as the "correct" time will vary each time you run it.

Hope that answers your questions.

Sam



Return to posts index

Tom Hepburn
Re: video and flash
on Jul 30, 2008 at 4:08:24 pm

Thanks for the response Sam. I appreciate it. I've gone the cue point route before which works really great in terms of syncing action on the right side of the screen with the talking head on the left side of the screen. This project would be much more interactive in the sense that the subject (video) will walk in front of an behind different animated "symbols."
It sounds like for something like this you'd recommend making a regular movie/animation in AfterEffects for example and encoding it as an FLV. Is that correct? I thought I would be able to save a lot of filesize by importing the video, but your point is well taken. I have had problems importing video.
I also, should have confessed that my weakest link is coding:)

Thanks again,
Tom



Return to posts index


Sam Mattern
Re: video and flash
on Jul 30, 2008 at 7:01:02 pm

You're right in that embedding the video in an SWF results in a smaller overall size. However, when using an external FLV, the initially loaded SWF is smaller and thus loads faster. Then the FLV can then be streamed in seamlessly. Plus, users are already used to interfacing with loading FLV video (Youtube, etc). I highly recommend going through the Flash Video Basics tutorials if you haven't.

I recently converted a project that loaded external SWF's of embedded video over to loading external FLV's. In doing so, I was able to get rid of two-thirds of the code while adding playback controls. So, surprisingly, the FLV method is both easier and takes less code.

Give it a try. We're all here for you!



Return to posts index

Tom Hepburn
Re: video and flash
on Jul 31, 2008 at 11:03:29 pm

Thanks Sam, it helps to know you're not alone.


Tom



Return to posts index

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
© 2018 CreativeCOW.net All Rights Reserved
[TOP]