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Todd Terry
Hiring an editor
on Jul 10, 2009 at 5:07:11 pm

Hey gang...

Hope Ron doesn't mind the cross post here...

Seems like these days everyone is laying off, or firing... but we're hiring.

My company is looking for a creative editor. If any of you business COWs come across a talented editor who's in the market for a change of scenery, please feel free to point them to our notice in the COW's "Jobs Offered - Higher Pay" section here, or to the employment section of our website.

Thanks gang,


T2

__________________________________
Todd Terry
Creative Director
Fantastic Plastic Entertainment, Inc.
fantasticplastic.com






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walter biscardi
Re: Hiring an editor
on Jul 10, 2009 at 5:55:36 pm

Dude, we have a Jobs Forum for these postings. I have a posting in there as well.

Walter Biscardi, Jr.
Editor, Colorist, Director, Writer, Consultant, Author.
Credits include multiple Emmy, Telly, Aurora and Peabody Awards.
Biscardi Creative Media

Creative Cow Forum Host:
Apple Final Cut Pro, Apple Motion, Apple Color, AJA Kona, Business & Marketing, Maxx Digital.

Read my Blog!


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cowcowcowcowcow
Ron Lindeboom
Re: Hiring an editor
on Jul 10, 2009 at 6:08:13 pm

[Todd Terry] "Hope Ron doesn't mind the cross post here..."

Oh no, yet again have I been forced to don my El Hombre Malo costume...

[Scene cuts to camera angle looking over man's shoulder into closet as he sifts through vintage 1970's pastel colored polyester leisure suits and other über-stylish vintage clothing. He finds a black and white cow-spotted spandex super costume with El Hombre Malo written across the front. Slipping it on, camera reveals intense burgundy hued wine stains on the shirt.]

"Bummer. I guess I forget to get it dry-cleaned after Nick was here."

So, you get off easy this time, Todd. El Hombre Malo in full costume with wine stains would never do. So, you are lucky, man.

[Strains of Emerson Lake & Palmer's '[Ew, what a] Lucky Man [he was]' plays in background.]

But let's not make a habit of these kinds of posts here, please.

Ron Lindeboom


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Todd Terry
Re: Hiring an editor
on Jul 10, 2009 at 6:11:49 pm

Hahahaha.... Ron's post was worth every bit of the wrath. Every bit.

Ahhhh... it pays to have fun.


T2

__________________________________
Todd Terry
Creative Director
Fantastic Plastic Entertainment, Inc.
fantasticplastic.com






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Mark Suszko
Re: Hiring an editor
on Jul 11, 2009 at 6:49:30 pm

Flip this into something on topic and useful: what do you look for when you want to hire an editor? Not specifically for Todd's opening, but to anybody, in general.


Reels first? Resume'/list of credits? Or personal interviews?

Do you hire based on what they're trained on, or what they've done with the tools they know NOW?

If you use a particular platform, do you disqualify the applicant because they are not specifically trained on it? I imagine this is true most of the time, since most places need you to hit the ground running and be productive on day one.


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Alan Lloyd
Re: Hiring an editor
on Jul 11, 2009 at 7:18:14 pm

If I was hiring an editor, I'd be looking at two things. First, I'd be inclined to think storytelling skills. I'd presume anyone who considered himself an editor could operate a chosen software platform, though sadly, that's where a lot of people end their progress.

It's the beginning. Using that platform to get from here to there is far more important than just clicking and dragging.

The other thing is...wait for it...patience. I've sat in online rooms with groups of people making decisions by committee, and it's not pretty. Sure, the meter's running, still, it's difficult to keep from getting edgy when four people go back and forth about something that really needs to be decided. Keeping a steady hand matters.

Since I cut my own stuff, I won't have this decision to make, at least for a while.


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grinner hester
Re: Hiring an editor
on Jul 11, 2009 at 8:38:45 pm

The reel is the deal. After that, it's a personality test. People skills are more than half of the gig so that has always been the most importent thing to me.



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Mike Cohen
Re: Hiring an editor
on Jul 11, 2009 at 10:21:37 pm

Having recently been through this, here is what I did:

1. Sift through the resumes. In my ad I asked for links to online video examples. No links, no interview.
Ok that is not entirely accurate - a couple of people brought their DVD to the interview. But seriously, it is very easy to post your stuff online.

2. I narrowed it down to 9 interviews. Each one took about an hour. It is exhausting doing more than two a day. Lots of talking.

3. Interview. No suit, no 2nd interview.
Again, this is not entirely true, but one should at least dress for success. Granted, success as an editor can mean sandals and a tank top. In other words, the candidate should dress for the job, but use your judgement based upon your company's culture. A suit can never hurt in my opinion.

4. The reel / interview. I do not let a great reel influence my decision too much - the personality and enthusiasm gets more weight. But enthusiasm and a crap reel is not good. Whereas a great reel usually goes hand in hand with enthusiasm, Youy gotta talk the talk AND walk the walk.

I am not so concerned about particular software or video formats. If you know FCP, you can learn Premiere, etc.

I was filling an entry-level job, but one in which the candidate will hit the ground running shooting and editing lots of different projects. I am looking for an understanding of aesthetics and basic editing understanding.

Let me break it down for you:
(the names and some personal details have been changed to protect the innocent)

1. Shirley - she had recently earned her Masters in communication. Apparently you can get that degree, at her institution, by not learning anything. Her reel was pretty bad. But she seemed to know what she was talking about and seemed intelligent. However the lack of any decent work samples, even considering it was college work, disqualified her.

2. Tom - He went to film school in Boston, and soon realized you can't do much with that - in Boston. So he worked at a sign shop for 10 years and then recently did a two year digital filmmaking program in Boston. Again, with an eye on working in film, this did not go as planned. He did have some freelance gigs with a few CT based production companies. His reel consisted primarily of a documentary about dairy farming in the state, which was shot with a home video quality camera with pretty shoddy editing. However, amazingly, it had won awards in some local film festivals. And his enthusiasm and intelligence were high, so this was an exception to the bad reel/good personality scenario.

3. Vince - his reel consisted of a wedding. In fact he was doing weddings as his vocation at the moment, and commented that he did not like doing weddings. But he didn't give me anything to go on, and he seemed pretty nervous, sweaty palms etc and I did most of the talking. Sorry Vince.

4. Dave - He had recently gone through the CT film office training program, in which you learn how to change film mags, setup dolly track and run a genny. This was with the promise that you would soon get lots of union-ready film work in CT's burgeoning film industry. Only problem being, that film production in CT tends to bring in crews from Boston and NY. So he was working in a garage. He oddly had graduated from the same institution as Shirley, but as a Bachelor's degree, and his reel was quite good. It was primarily his student film project. Most student film projects are cut form the same mold - 21 year olds acting like 40 year olds in silly adult situations. But he pulled it off, had some nice camera work, lighting and editing.

5. Charles - This was a guy who talked the talk, was enthusiastic but had nothing to show for it. No reel to speak of and no real experience. I think he was an English major - which is OK if you have some experience - but he didn't. I think actually showed me a video he shot for a friend, which was actually nice.

6 & 7 - I don't remember these, probably for good reason. I know one of the interviews lasted about 15 minutes. One of them was wearing a stained sweater vest, the other one a bathrobe. Not really.

8. Ricky - He seemed talk the talk pretty well and his reel, once we figured out how to play it, was not bad. But the fact that he brought a DVD that did not play to his interview said something about his attention to detail. Maybe this is too harsh, but you only get one chance to make a first impression.

9. Steve - He came in with a reel, a suit, knowledge about our company (you'd be surprised) and enthusiasm and intelligence. His reel consisted of a documentary about the melting polar ice caps, actually filmed on location with a college group. The video was good and had been in some film festivals also. Steve seemed to want the job. Everyone else wanted ANY job they could get, but Steve wanted THIS job. You want to hire someone who wants to work for you, not just someone who wants a paycheck.

So it comes down to trying to find someone's work ethic without actually working with them.

I made an Excel - the best way to sort out information, and decided to bring in Steve, Tom and Dave for a 2nd interview with me and the boss and our other editor. In the end, it came down to the personality/perceived work ethic - if that is there and it is legitimate, you can teach someone what he or she does not know. There is about a year of teaching for new hires anyway, but the enthusiasm needs to be real. You can't teach that.

We hired Steve, who is probably reading this right now thinking, "Polar ice caps? You sure you remember our interview?"

Once on the job, it will become apparent if you have made the right choice or not. It is a chance you take. Hopefully you have gone through a selection process so believe you are hiring the right person.

Good Luck.

Mike Cohen


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Emre Tufekci S.O.A.
Re: Hiring an editor
on Jul 12, 2009 at 1:44:09 am

My hiring practice is a little simpler. When they come in to interview I talk to them for about 5 minutes off topic to see if they are pleasant and smart.

Then I lead them to one of my edit bay where I have completely disassembled one of my AVID machines. I ask them to put it back together and call me when they are done.

If they can make it work, we look at reel and talk more.



Emre Tufekci
http://www.productionpit.com



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walter biscardi
Re: Hiring an editor
on Jul 12, 2009 at 2:30:11 am

[Emre Tufekci S.O.A.] "Then I lead them to one of my edit bay where I have completely disassembled one of my AVID machines. I ask them to put it back together and call me when they are done. "

What does this prove? That's the LAST thing I want any editor doing to my equipment. Way too much money invested in all my gear and especially the SAN. I don't really need my editor to be an engineer, just be creative and let me take care of the engineering side.


Walter Biscardi, Jr.
Editor, Colorist, Director, Writer, Consultant, Author.
Credits include multiple Emmy, Telly, Aurora and Peabody Awards.
Biscardi Creative Media

Creative Cow Forum Host:
Apple Final Cut Pro, Apple Motion, Apple Color, AJA Kona, Business & Marketing, Maxx Digital.

Read my Blog!


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Emre Tufekci S.O.A.
Re: Hiring an editor
on Jul 12, 2009 at 1:27:43 pm

We hire people for long term and invest time in training them.

I want my editors to understand what they are working with and get under the hood if there is a problem. I dont like people that throw their hand in the air as soon as there is a problem.

Our DoP people are very creative cinematographers and DIT's.

Our AD's are people who have worked their way up the ranks, they understand what every department does and know how to do it themselves.......and so on

This is the way I was trained when I started the business and it has worked for me so far. I have very talented, creative people that solve any problem they face.


Emre Tufekci
http://www.productionpit.com



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Todd Terry
Re: Hiring an editor
on Jul 12, 2009 at 2:14:54 pm

Myself, I don't care what platform someone edits on, since they are all so similar these days. If someone is say, wildly creative and totally kicks butt but has experience limited to FCP... no problem. I know they could switch gears to CS4 in no time flat.

One thing that I will start looking more vigilantly for is the ability to follow simple directions. We have posted our job availability for just a few days now, but have already received quite a number of applicants. Our application requirements were spelled out painfully simple, I thought... basically just resume and reel sent to such-and-such address. Out of all the applicants so far I've had exactly ONE do it the way we asked. ONE.

One applicant said "I think you can find my resume on my website."

Another said "Google me and you can find several video samples on line."

Please. If you want a job, do what it takes to try to get it. When I told my GM that I wanted physcial reels submitted he said "Why? You can see things easily on line?" True, but I want real reels for two reasons... firstly, I want to be able to sit down and watch them on a real television monitor, maybe even in the comfort of my own living room. I don't want to watch someone's postage-stamp-sized work, I want to see it the way our clients do.

Secondly, it's a test, pure and simple. If someone cares enough about our position and is interested enough in it and wants it badly enough, they will take the time to burn me a DVD and send it to me. Total investment on their part is about five minutes and two bucks. I get scads of DVDs across my desk every week... from people just hoping we might be looking to hire. If someone who knows we might be looking for someone like them can't bother to make an effort to follow some simple directions... I don't want 'em.

Sorry if that was a bit of a rant... but just had a couple of new submissions come in. Incorrectly, of course.


T2

__________________________________
Todd Terry
Creative Director
Fantastic Plastic Entertainment, Inc.
fantasticplastic.com






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Ron Lindeboom
Re: Hiring an editor
on Jul 12, 2009 at 3:21:48 pm

[Todd Terry] "I don't want to watch someone's postage-stamp-sized work,"


Er, um, excuse this interruption to your regularly scheduled program...

[Man runs over to his superhero costume closet and shuffles through until he finds a Billy Mays PITCHMAN costume and he pulls it on, he pulls on the Billy Mays head -- it doesn't fit, the Billy Mays head is to scale and those that knew him know he had a big head.]

Reels got you down? Too small to see? Do reels leave that nasty stain in your brain because they just aren't big enough to get the job done? Hi, I'm Billy Mays and I want to introduce you to Creative COW Reels. What?$#@!? You say you've never used them? Run to your computer and watch this one... Go ahead, I'll wait until you get back...







Impressed? Don't be. This isn't even one of the biggest reels we have here. In fact they can get a lot bigger. How? We use Billy Mays Wonderstream™ to bring these beautiful reels to you. What is Wonderstream™ you ask? Hah! I'm glad you asked!

But in order to give you the answer, you have to call now and if you upload your reel, we will give you not one, but TWO explanations as to why Wonderstream™ is the greatest thing since, well...me, Billy Mays!

And if you call now, you won't pay $19.95. No, no, no. You won't even pay $14.95. Nope. In fact, you won't even pay $9.95. So what's it cost you ask? I am glad you did!

It's FREE!

But you have to call now! Operators are standing by.

And if you call, we will host up to 900 pixel wide files that can weigh up to 100MB, all in glorious AAC-LC audio encoding to digitally blast your sub-woofer and the neighbors next door.

So, call now. Operators are standing by...

but sorry, I can no longer be.



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Mark Suszko
Re: Hiring an editor
on Jul 13, 2009 at 8:53:47 pm

Interesting argument about dress code. I haven't had to interview for a job in twenty years, but if I had to tomorrow, I would still wear a coat and tie. You know, to me it is about respect and formality in the hiring process. A lot of us editors don't know how good we have it day to day; some of you can come in in flip-flops and a thong and get away with it, it seems. But this is not really a get-your-hands-dirty kind of job, and it is not impossible to work this job in a coat and tie. Some places DO make their video crews wear them, I'm thinking mostly of high end banks and certain religious organizations.

So, even though the day to day standard is business casual or slightly less than that, I don't as a rule dress down too far because I don't want to convey too sloppy of an image. Dress shirt or nice polo is the usual. At any moment I may have to jump up and go mix with people that are way over my pay grade, and so no, I don't dress in skater shorts or t-shirts. And if I am interviewing or being interviewed, by golly, how one dresses signals what they think of the job they want.

An old tip for those wanting to advance is to dress a little teeny bit above your current position. What it does is send subtle signals of distinction that you are an ambitious and forward-thinking person, ready to be advanced, and it naturally commands a little more recognition/respect when you dress more like the "grown-ups" than the "kids". Semiotics. A long time ago when I was dating my future wife and about to meet her parents, she made me toss out my favorite chuka boots and go buy new nice semi-dress shoes. Turns out her dad, a depression-era guy, tells a lot about people and judges them by their shoes and how well they care for them. For him it is a gauge of their overall character, expressed in one small personal grooming detail. The modern version of that I guess is the Tv commercial where the stain on a guy's shirt yells so loud you can't hear the guy.

So I wear jeans most days, or dockers/chinos, but a nice dress shirt and adding a tie to that is not a huge deal once in a while. If I need to interview, the very least I will bring is a jacket and tie and good slacks and dress shoes. If I interview you, I'm looking for "tells" to your real character, who you are under it all.

That's my obsolete personal take on it anyway.


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Todd Terry
Re: Hiring an editor
on Jul 13, 2009 at 9:11:55 pm

Oops.... I hope that Mark never catches a glimpse of my daily attire... the ever-present Hawaiian shirt, cargo shorts, and baseball cap (a baseball cap, usually Yankees or Dodgers, is required for directors by federal law). At least they're clean.

I was a buttoned-down guy for 12 corporate years, and when I got out of that I gave away a dozen Brooks Brothers suits. Now, I pretty much look the same whether in house editing all by myself, on location directing, or meeting with some executive bigwig. Usually though my partner (who is the shined-shoes half) comes along, I think he passes me off as "one of those creative types, you know."

I don't think I've ever had it make a bit of difference to a client. It might but I don't think so. If it has, at least I was comfortable... ha.

Then again, if a job applicant showed up dressed like me, I'd probably think he was a bum.


T2

__________________________________
Todd Terry
Creative Director
Fantastic Plastic Entertainment, Inc.
fantasticplastic.com






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Mike Cohen
Re: Hiring an editor
on Jul 13, 2009 at 9:14:05 pm

I should add that in our company, editors are not only sitting in their offices 8 hours/day. Our editors also go out and shoot - sometimes in the OR, sometimes in a corporate board room, sometimes in a college lecture hall, and sometimes not shooting at all but working a trade show booth, doing AV support at a conference, etc. I sometimes keep a sportcoat in my car just in case. I would say I dress up 20-30 days a year.

So as Mark has suggested, you can tell if a job candidate is someone you want representing your company out in the world. If someone wore jeans and a sweater vest or polo shirt to an interview, I'm not saying I would not consider everything they have to offer, it just becomes part of the puzzle.

Today you may be cutting a video, tomorrow you may be in scrubs shooting surgery, the day after that interviewing the CEO of a Fortune 50 company or the director of a government agency.

Put your best foot forward to let me know that I would trust you to put my company's best foot forward on my behalf.

Maybe here in New England we are a bit more traditional, must be our Puritan ancestry. Although it would be nice if supermarkets sold wine. But that's another thread altogether!


Mike Cohen


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Ron Lindeboom
Re: Hiring an editor
on Jul 13, 2009 at 10:08:06 pm

[Mike Cohen] "Maybe here in New England we are a bit more traditional, must be our Puritan ancestry. Although it would be nice if supermarkets sold wine. But that's another thread altogether!"

No, it's this thread, Mike. :o)

You could move here, Mike, we sell wine. Good wine, too. Just ask Nick.

Ron Lindeboom
Self Appointed Ambassador and Wine Marketing Specialist for the Paso Robles Wine Industry™
specializing in the best wineries: Carmody-McKnight, Halter Ranch, Adelaida Cellars, Opolo, Vihuela and others as we discover them
currently refusing to represent: Peachy Canyon, Tobin James, Eagle Castle, Martin & Weyrick, York Mountain, and too many others to name here


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David Roth Weiss
Re: Hiring an editor
on Jul 13, 2009 at 9:24:49 pm

[Mark Suszko] "some of you can come in in flip-flops and a thong and get away with it,"

A thong? That's a very scary thought for most editors. However, I have decided to allow my new assistant to wear a thong and flip-flops if she wishes... Here she is logging our current project on her Macbook.



David Roth Weiss
Director/Editor
David Weiss Productions, Inc.
Los Angeles

POST-PRODUCTION WITHOUT THE USUAL INSANITY ™


A forum host of Creative COW's Apple Final Cut Pro, Business & Marketing, and Indie Film & Documentary forums.


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Bill Dewald
Re: Hiring an editor
on Jul 12, 2009 at 6:53:33 pm

[Mike Cohen] "No suit, no 2nd interview. "

I've worked at places where the opposite was true. "Hey, check out the candidate - he showed up in a suit!" My rule of thumb has been to wear the nicest set of threads that you'd wear on the job. Do your editors wear suits to work?

Also - how'd you end up interviewing nine people with no professional editing experience for your edit gig? I always thought the competition was a lot thicker than that....


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Mike Cohen
Re: Hiring an editor
on Jul 12, 2009 at 7:59:41 pm

As I said, the rules are not hard and fast. And no you don't wear a suit at a lot of jobs but traditionally you wear a suit or a sharp outfit to an interview. Call it "tradition"

This was my hiring process for an entry level job. i did not say these folks had no professional experience, our advertisement called for 1-2 years experience - including solid work in college.

I was hired right out of college into the same job, so perhaps you could say I was looking for me.

Mike


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David Roth Weiss
Re: Hiring an editor
on Jul 12, 2009 at 8:16:40 pm

[Mike Cohen] "And no you don't wear a suit at a lot of jobs but traditionally you wear a suit or a sharp outfit to an interview. Call it "tradition" "

Mike,

In Los Angeles, no editor dressing-up for an interview, especially in a suit, would ever be considered a likely candidate for a job. And, thankfully so...

David

David Roth Weiss
Director/Editor
David Weiss Productions, Inc.
Los Angeles

POST-PRODUCTION WITHOUT THE USUAL INSANITY ™


A forum host of Creative COW's Apple Final Cut Pro, Business & Marketing, and Indie Film & Documentary forums.


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Mike Cohen
Re: Hiring an editor
on Jul 12, 2009 at 8:40:42 pm

This is the great thing about these forums. You get different perspectives on a subject which can be, as in this case, very different.
Mike


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walter biscardi
Re: Hiring an editor
on Jul 12, 2009 at 11:56:35 pm

[Bill Dewald] "I've worked at places where the opposite was true. "Hey, check out the candidate - he showed up in a suit!" My rule of thumb has been to wear the nicest set of threads that you'd wear on the job. Do your editors wear suits to work? "

I specifically tell my candidates NOT to wear a suit, I tell them to dress as I would expect to see them come to work. Casual but clean. This tells me right away if they know the appropriate way to dress for a client. You can be casual, but clean.

I won't turn away a candidate if he / she wears a suit, but I would never turn away someone for not wearing one.



Walter Biscardi, Jr.
Editor, Colorist, Director, Writer, Consultant, Author.
Credits include multiple Emmy, Telly, Aurora and Peabody Awards.
Biscardi Creative Media

Creative Cow Forum Host:
Apple Final Cut Pro, Apple Motion, Apple Color, AJA Kona, Business & Marketing, Maxx Digital.

Read my Blog!


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Shane Ross
Re: Hiring an editor
on Jul 13, 2009 at 10:05:23 pm

Yeah, I have never worn a suit to an interview. Nice jeans and a button up shirt, yes. Suit, no. That actually sends the wrong signal to the people out here...they don't want to see that. They want to see nice dressers, but not suits. Not shorts and t-shirts either, although you can wear those once hired.

In fact, when in college we were shown a film on how to interview for a job in hollywood. It showed us how to dress and how to act...and that video also discouraged the suit approach, as well as the shorts and t-shirt. Dress casual, slacks or jeans and a button up shirt or polo. This wasn't a business job. Heck, you won't catch a majority of producers in a suit either, unless they are meeting with BUSINESS people, like the network heads or money guys. And even then it is a maybe.

As for the "here is my Avid, put it together and you're hired," that says squat about storytelling ability. 85-95% of the editors out here can't take apart and reassemble an NLE. That is not their job. Their job is to tell a story. The technicians job is to assemble the Avid. And it is the assistants job to figure the small issues with the system and address them. Because editors are hired to tell stories, not to build Avids.

if they can do all that tech stuff AND tell a story, that is a good plus, but it is not a requirement.


Shane



GETTING ORGANIZED WITH FINAL CUT PRO DVD...don't miss it.
Read my blog, Little Frog in High Def


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Steve Kownacki
Re: Hiring an editor
on Jul 14, 2009 at 1:43:15 pm

The dress code thing I'm getting over, but I wouldn't say you could ever be over-dressed. I'm old school and while a suit isn't req'd, dress casual with a tie shows me that the candidate respects me. If they did their research, they'd know what to wear. Too few applicants are not interested in me and my business, they just want a job. Not good. I really don't care what you say you can do... what are you going to do for me.

I'm retentive about things, and I find 2 types of people out there: those so organized there's no time for creativity, and those so creative there's no chance of ever finding all the files to do an archive. There needs to be a methodology to file structure and management. Looking at a Pshop file can show this - is it 50 layers of "layer 1", "layer 2", or are they appropriately named, grouped, etc? Look at a project folder, are the 100's of files all floating around aimlessly or are they nicely organized in subfolders? At some point we update almost every client's stuff, it's gotta be quick to archive and painless to re-load, batch footage and fix it up.

Client relationships. You are an extension of me/my business. I don't want a clone of me (that would be bad for the world in general), but they have to react the way I would. This is a learned skill.

What I really want is the preditor - producer/editor. You have to be able to size-up the project and give me your input. If somebody says (there's some great quotes in the contract thread) "this'll only take an hour" the editor should be able to intelligently say yes or no and why. Or provide the parameters - "we can do the entire video edit, but not all the graphics you want, or skip this to make sure we have time for that." Obviously not an entry-level skillset. If I personally say this will take 2 hours, it'll be 2 hours for a capable person, so ya gotta know your tools.

I actually have to cull this down for my ad posting by end of the week.

Written in my t-shirt, khaki shorts and sandals eating a late breakfast at my desk - not the editing desk, that gets you booted out the door!

Steve



Jump to the FFP Website



View Steve Kownacki's profile on LinkedIn




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Nick Griffin
Re: Hiring an editor
on Jul 14, 2009 at 7:51:53 pm

I'm late to the thread but here goes:

1) [Mike Cohen] "so perhaps you could say I was looking for me."

Yea. Good luck with that. In 30 years I've found one guy who is willing to work as hard as I do and of a mindset to do so day in, day out. I pay him well and treat him as the rarity he is.

2) [Ron Lindeboom] "Good wine, too. Just ask Nick."

YES! Carmody-McKnight, Halter Ranch, Adelaida Cellars are each mind boggling, but probably not supermarket fare. (Unless you have a REALLY upscale supermarket.) Mr. & Mrs. Lindeboom truly found my weakness for fine grapes.

3) Personally I'm offering Weiss' new assistant a position here as Senior Editor. (And Mrs. Griffin is putting her divorce attorney on speed dial.)


As to dress code, I prefer a silk tie, custom made oxford shirt, pocket square and hand-tailored suit coat worn over blue jeans and flip flops. Sends the perfect message -- I can be corporate, but only to a point.

Common sense is really what's needed in dressing for an interview. A little more dressed up than normal, clean, neat and looking orderly. Torn T-shirts send the completely wrong message. They scream: "I have no idea why I'm here so I probably can't be trusted to know what I'm doing and especially can't be trusted around clients."


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Todd Terry
Re: Hiring an editor
on Jul 14, 2009 at 8:08:18 pm

[Nick Griffin] "Sends the perfect message -- I can be corporate, but only to a point."

I'm suddenly remembering something that I had almost completely blotted out of my brain...

A couple of people in here who know me better than others might remember the dirty secret that many years ago before I was a wanabe movie director I was a wanabe actor (thankfully my legal name was already registered with SAG, the upside being that people can't look up bad movies and TV shows I was in because they don't know what name I worked under... heh heh).

I can now remember going to many a meeting with directors, casting people, or auditions always wearing my "gosh-aren't-I-sharp-but-oh-so-causal" garb:

the Armani sport coat over a black tee-shirt.



Thank you, Michael Mann!



Times have changed.....


T2

__________________________________
Todd Terry
Creative Director
Fantastic Plastic Entertainment, Inc.
fantasticplastic.com






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Mark Raudonis
Re: Hiring an editor
on Jul 15, 2009 at 12:49:58 am

Regarding the "suit" thing. In all the years that I've been hiring editors out here in LA, I've only had ONE guy show up in a suit. He was from out of town, so I forgave him the faux pas. We actually hired him, but to this day still give him grief about it!

Dress codes are a subtle thing. It's really very regional. What's appropriate for one part of the country will be laughed at in another. The import thing is that the applicant know enough to figure out what's appropriate for you. That sends the message that they will fit in.

Mark




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grinner hester
Re: Hiring an editor
on Jul 15, 2009 at 2:24:59 pm

I always made it a point to put my resume on tie-dyed paper and show up in my comfy clothes for the interview. This way, we were on the same page as I interviewed them. And I WAS the one interviewing them. They already wanted me or I'd not be there interviewing. What I needed to know was "is this a place I wanna spend most of my waking hours?"
I found most employers loved this. All of the ones I wanted to hang with did, anyway and it was a very simple way to weed out the places I would have been very temporary at.
Dress codes are for places with power trips or clientele with power trips. Artists need to be comfy. It's that simple to me.
A suit?
Not even at funerals, man.



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Crystal J. Meisner
Re: Hiring an editor
on Jul 15, 2009 at 4:41:34 pm

Todd - Having read both your advertisement and the posts to it here on COW, I feel you've put your desires very plainly out there. Your advertisement is very concise and explicit, and shows to me that you're wanting to find only the appropriate candidates to apply, and if they're not willing to follow what you've so substantially gone to the effort to explain, then no, they don't deserve a further look.
For those who do follow your instructions, then my suggestion is this - give them a test. Start with a paper exam that elicits their actual knowledge of editing - the tools and the terms. You'll find there are those who are knowledgeable and those who try to BS their way along.
Then give them an editing test. A 2-part test in which they do both a 'do-your-own-thing creatively on the software you know at home' and an in-house "direction specific" piece. At the end of the paper test, give them the footage for the creative piece to take with them. Give everyone the same footage and give them a deadline to get it back - within a time frame reasonable to what you'd expect them to complete the project in.
Upon reviewing those submissions, and you've gotten the field narrowed down to a few top candidates (your choice on how many, but I'd go 2-3), then bring them in to work on your equipment, with a different batch of footage and and "client-specific" instructions. By all means, give a crash course on the Premiere software before they start if they've never used it, but this will allow you to get a feel for how quickly they'll adapt and how they'll follow those instructions in-house, under time constraints. Then your final choice should be clear.
Now there are those out there who'll think I'm nuts, but the proof is in the pudding, and I went through a similar type of test for a position once. My educational credentials were minimal, as was my reel, but I kicked the other candidate's butt in the test and was offered the job on the spot.
It's just too bad I'm not interested in living in the humidity of the southeast, otherwise I'd be applying for this job myself. You sound like the kind of boss I'd like to have.
Oh, and as to the interview attire - I find casual business is best, because, I'm sorry, but for those with a 'take-it-or-leave-it' attitude, I'd be leaving it. Show me just once you respect me as a prospective employer enough to "clean up" a little. A polo shirt instead of the Hawaiian, and no flip flops. 'Grinner' may think he's interviewing me, but if I've got the money, that puts me in the power position, and I'm interviewing him to see IF I really want him or not. Getting the interview isn't getting the offer.
Lots of luck finding your editor.



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