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jason stoddart
lighting
on Feb 22, 2009 at 2:10:58 am

we do live music video production. We have 10 par 56 cans i think the color temp is about 2800. If i get more lights with different color temp. will that cause problems. should i just get more par 56 so they are all the same?


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Dale Doebert
Re: lighting
on Feb 26, 2009 at 3:01:34 pm

If you are simply looking for more "punch" at the same color temp then I would stick along the lines of what you have. My opinion would be to add interest with different color temp lights or use gels. Either way whatever the dominate light source is....and then it's temperature is what will effect your color balance.

Dale Doebert
dale@tiltmedia.com
Video and Event Producer
Tilt Media Inc.


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Bill Davis
Re: lighting
on Mar 1, 2009 at 12:03:57 am

God I HATE PAR cans.

Really. next to halogen shop lights, the're probably the WORST video lights in common use today.

They're fine for people watching a life performance, but for cameras they're miserably, totally, awful.

They produce HARSH shadows. People regularly use party gel colors with them that suck up most of the illumination and cause cameras to strain to expose properly. The red ones tend to vomit out light at precisely the part of the red spectrum that causes many video formats severe chroma bleed.

I'd rather shoot under ANYTHING other than par cans.

Sadly, they're also pretty cheap - so there are a LOT of them out there.

If you MUST have them on the stage - at least set up some honest focusable video lights (preferably fresnels) with barn doors and set them to fill the FACES of the band members from a gentle angle like 20-30 degrees off axis NEVER directly paralell to the camera angle which gives you drivers license lighting.

And if any of the band members are older than 30 - use some judicious front fill from a footlight angle so that the bags under their eyes and their wrinkles fill in a bit.

Go rent any Eagles video produced in the last 7 years and notice all the fill light from up, down, and both sides? Notice how smooth their faces look even tho they're all past 50 now? No accident. Notice how when you see colored lights they're in the BACKGROUND and not on the faces?

If you've GOT to use PAR cans - use them to light things - like walls and amps and plants - NEVER people.

Did I mention I HATE PAR cans?

Sorry for the rant.








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Jeff Mack
Re: lighting
on Mar 5, 2009 at 1:15:54 am

Bill,

I am in the same predicament. I am asked often to go to a bar and produce youtube vids. Often the lighting sucks. Do you have a general statement that a one man show like me can go in with to try to do a general job for web video? Of course when you start out, and I assume you have quite a while ago, you have to try to impress as soon as possible with NO money. Any suggestions to walking in and geting decent images without relying on gain and exposure to the max?

Jeff



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Bill Davis
Re: lighting
on Mar 5, 2009 at 2:10:05 am

Sure Jeff,

First and foremost, the most important element in any video image are the people's faces.

If you make the people look good, then suddenly everyone's delighted with the overall video. BTW, this is equally true of shooting a corporate CEO or an Alice Cooper tribute band. (The Alice lead singer probably took hours to get the makeup right - rendering their face as a glowing smeared deep blue-lit blob in the entire video just won't do!)

This means that you LOOK at the performers individually and use the lighting and staging in order to make them stand out and look as good as possible.

Start by determining your camera position. Then focus on your shots of each performer. Look at the camera frame for each band member. Each one should be illuminated to show them at their best. That would typically mean a variation of 3 point interview lighting for EACH. Now don't get freaked. For a 5 man band, this doesn't mean you need 15 lights to do a good job (tho that IS one approach!). It DOES mean you have to figure out how to get a reasonably angled key light on each face. And at least some fill light. You can set backlights to pop each player out of the background, or you can do something as simple as putting a temporary piece of light foamcore behind the horn player so that the shape of their dark hair doesn't get lost in the dark back wall.

Or maybe one broad back (rim) light on a really tall stand can act as a shape modeling light for ALL the band members.

Maybe a couple of strategically placed 650 fresnels at the back of the room - ruthlessly barned door'd off to avoid spill and scrimmed on one so that it's more fill than key might just raise the level enough so the faces aren't totally screwed by the emerald gel the house light guy thought looked so hip on the stage PARS.

The stage background, stage depth, ceiling height, and what instruments you have available are all variables - but when push comes to shove, lighting is all about providing shaping and modeling of the faces and bodies of the players to provide the appearance of three dimensional human forms on a flat TV surface.

Another thing to remember (AND to remind the band about) is that the crowd will see them once tonight. On video, they may be seeing them for YEARS to come. Video lighting should never kill the whole vibe and suck the life out of the performance space - but it IS very important if the band wants to learn to harness the awesome power of video as a tool for exposure and a path to continued success.

Good luck.






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Andy Stinton
Re: lighting
on Mar 17, 2009 at 9:13:47 pm

Great thread . Bill I'm getting the impression that you don't like Par Cans :)

Whereas everything that has been said is true true and truer. I think that one can get away with a fair bit in this rock and roll scenario. The atmosphere and the style can play a large part in the end result of the video. I have over exposed videos , made them into black and white, over saturated the colors etc . All of the preceding negates some of the limitations of budget constrained lighting. At the end of the day it's the style and editing of the video that will get you more work. I have a saying " If you can't hide it feature it"
Those par cans harsh lighting can bring a edge to to an image that is visually appealing , depending on the music.

Sorry Bill but my biggest enemy on these smaller shoots is a lighting guy ( a band members brother in law) who has no idea what he is doing and plays the light-board like a drunken sailor. At that point all bets are off:)

Andy Stinton
Corporate Video
Live & Stage Events
Business Practices


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