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How do I create a 16x9 for a SD DVD? ASAP ...of course!

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Kevin Dennis
How do I create a 16x9 for a SD DVD? ASAP ...of course!
on Nov 11, 2008 at 3:55:44 pm

I'm sorry if this question has been posted before.. I looked but could not find the answer I needed.

How do I create a file that will be played on a HD TV but from a SD DVD player?

I will be creating the file from scratch, no source footage, all graphics with an animated background. Do I start with an HD or an SD comp in After Effect?

Then after the source file is created what setting do I use in Encore?

Working in CS3.

Thanks Kevin


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Joe Bowden
Re: How do I create a 16x9 for a SD DVD? ASAP ...of course!
on Nov 11, 2008 at 4:01:08 pm

The simplest and most trouble-free workflow is to work entirely standard definition from AE right to Encore.



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Kevin Dennis
Re: How do I create a 16x9 for a SD DVD? ASAP ...of course!
on Nov 11, 2008 at 4:41:51 pm

Joe,
thanks for the feedback...

But the content needs to be displayed on a wide screen LCD TV fillling the screen without distorting logos, etc.

If I do SD from start to finish, wont the content be stretched when the tv autoscales and if the tv doesnt autoscale there would be black on the sides. No?

Kevin


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Jeff Bellune
Re: How do I create a 16x9 for a SD DVD? ASAP ...of course!
on Nov 11, 2008 at 4:45:28 pm

Make your SD 16:9.

-Jeff

The Focal Easy Guide to Adobe Encore DVD 2.0


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Joe Bowden
Re: How do I create a 16x9 for a SD DVD? ASAP ...of course!
on Nov 11, 2008 at 4:46:16 pm

No. 16:9 SD video will completely fill the screen of a high definition TV.

However, if there are controls on the TV to zoom or stretch the signal and the viewer has incorrectly chosen these settings, there is nothing that you can do as a DVD author to make it look correct on an incorrect setting.



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Kevin Dennis
Re: How do I create a 16x9 for a SD DVD? ASAP ...of course!
on Nov 11, 2008 at 4:58:02 pm

How can I put this another way...
Did you ever rent a movie from Block Buster on a SD DVD?
Often you have the option of viewing the wide screen version on your 16x9 HD tv. This is without having a dvd with upscaling HDMI output.

The image never looks distorted...

How do they do this?

Thanks for the help!
Kev


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Joe Bowden
Re: How do I create a 16x9 for a SD DVD? ASAP ...of course!
on Nov 11, 2008 at 5:03:48 pm

Widescreen DVDs are not always 16:9 - sometimes they are 4:3 Letterboxed.

Encore is perfectly capable of creating a true 16:9 DVD. Just make sure your assets are 16:9 and your project is SD. Everything will be fine.



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Brent Dunn
Re: How do I create a 16x9 for a SD DVD? ASAP ...of course!
on Nov 19, 2008 at 6:03:28 pm

I can feel your frustration. It sounds like you are creating your own Graphics material to show on a DVD. You mentioned no source footage. I'm a little confused there. What are you actually going to show on the DVD?

If you create graphics, make the size 1920 x 1080 for HD or widescreen format.

Your source footage needs to be widescreen format 16:9. It doesn't have to be HD. HD & SD doesn't matter as long as the footage shot or graphics created are made the correct size.

Otherwise your 4:3 standard will not fill the screen.





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Bonnie Zylka
Re: How do I create a 16x9 for a SD DVD? ASAP ...of course!
on Nov 26, 2008 at 5:06:09 pm

Hi! I am learning some Encore stuff and came across this post! I just bought a big 50" HDTV and had some issues with getting the DVD's to play right...so I got a new DVD player and while researching that purchase I read a great article explaining much of why this is...and you can find it here Let me take some parts of that white paper and post it here, hopefully it answers your question as to why Blockbuster DVD's play fine!!

"In the NTSC television system used in North America, Standard Definition displays 30 still picture frames, of 480 horizontal lines of resolution each, per second. This video resolution is often called 480i, in which "i" stands for "Interlaced."
Each of these picture frames is displayed line-by-line on the screen in two passes. Each pass consists of 240 alternating horizontal lines, which together are called a "field". Two passes or two interlacing fields make a full frame of 480 horizontal lines. The rapid succession of each 240-line field to the next gives viewers a sense of continuous motion through "persistence of vision", and to the naked eye the image looks solid and whole.
As TV screen sizes increase, the drawbacks of 480i become more apparent in the form of visible scan lines, flickering images, and jagged lines.

High Definition (HD) is the next evolutionary step toward better video quality. HDTV supports many video formats with higher picture resolutions. The two most common formats are 720p, in which each picture frame consists of 720 horizontal lines displayed progressively, and 1080i, in which each picture frame consists of 1080 horizontal lines displayed in two interlaced passes of 540 lines each. Better video quality is achieved by having more lines in each picture frame so more details can be displayed.

In order for an HDTV to show the best possible picture quality, the video signal must be converted to the "native rate" of the display (the primary resolution that the screen supports). This can be performed either within the TV itself, or externally at the video source. Although it is true that every HDTV comes equipped with circuitry to perform this conversion, generally the set manufacturers use basic, unsophisticated scaling chips that do an inadequate job.

The TV may enlarge the video to fill up the screen, but usually does not address many complicated issues in properly handling of the video signal to create the best possible picture quality. For optimal display result, it is best to feed the HDTV with a native HD video signal so that the TV does not have to do the zooming.
How well the conversion from Standard Definition to High Definition is performed by the circuitry in the electronic devices will determine how good the video image looks on screen. In the case of DVD, which is still encoded at Standard Definition resolution, this is almost always best performed within the DVD player so that the display's own internal components won't have to struggle with these steps and can simply present exactly the signal provided to them."

The article also goes on to describe how important your connection between the HDTV and your DVD player is...particularly if the DVD player is doing the up-converting.
Your HDTV is completely digital. The only cable that transfers digital information from one thing to the other is HDMI (it doesn't matter what kind of cable you use...dont waste your money on a monster cable!) What we used to use are AV cables (the little red/yellow/white plugs!?) and those transfer ANALOG content.
So...lets say you get a great DVD player that up-converts your SD video to HD and then sends it to your HDTV...if it sends that video via HDMI cable, it is sending HD digital video. If you have your super cool DVD player connected to your super cool HDTV with AV cables or anything else that is analog...you have effectively wasted your money! The DVD player up-converts...then the CABLE re-converts the info to analog sd and your HDTV is left doing the up-converting at the end of the connection. Which...obviously results in less than perfect color, flicker and some random happenings because the HDTV's are built to DISPLAY...not up-convert!!

Hope that helps. It helped me a ton to understand what was going on!!



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Peter Gruden
Re: How do I create a 16x9 for a SD DVD? ASAP ...of course!
on Dec 2, 2008 at 8:24:28 pm

To do what you want you should do this - this is the simplest method:

-make a new composition in After Effects, with D1/DV widescreen preset; the picture will be 16:9 ratio but still 720 pixel wide (for PAL or NTSC)

-when you import the AE render in Encore the track will automaticaly switch to 16:9, you cannot change this (if you use external mpeg encoder, set it to 16:9, Encore will recognize this when you import it)

-make graphics for menu in Photoshop with 1024x576 pixels(PAL) and import it into Encore; or you can create a wide menu in Encore and open it in Photoshop, and create your menu from there


The better way is to select After Effects composition preset D1/DV Widescreen Square Pixel 1024x576, and on rendering just strech it horizontaly to 70,31% or to 720x576 pixels(for PAL). While you work in AE, your graphic and text will look much better on the screen. Compare both compositions and you will not want to work with video pixels again. It makes sense to work with square pixels up to the final render. This is also true for menu graphic.



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