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Sony EX-3 records five files

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Brian Barkley
Sony EX-3 records five files
on Mar 10, 2009 at 6:40:03 pm

The Sony EX-3 camera records file files, MP4, SMI, PPN, XML, BIM.
Can I just import mp4 file and delete the others. I am not sure what they are used for?


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Craig Seeman
Re: Sony EX-3 records five files
on Mar 10, 2009 at 8:12:28 pm

DigiBeta comes in a cassette. Can I throw away the cassette and the spools and just keep the tape?

I got this film with all these sprocket holes on the sides. They don't have any picture in them so can I just cut them off and keep the middle part with the picture?

Sony included those files because they have no value?

Sorry for the sarcasm but not knowing what they do is not the same as not being useful. It's the metadata for your camera master. Back up/archive your camera master.

What you do to import depends on your NLE but if you were to import a DigiBeta camera master do you then throw any part of it out?

Please read ClipBrowser manual. Please read Sony's workflow papers on their site regarding specific NLEs. While they aren't complete (IMHO) they give you lots of clues. Get Vortex or Callbox DVDs on camera and workflow.

Step one. LEARN the workflow.
Step one is NOT, throw out parts of your camera master.

If you want to experiment, AFTER learning the workflow, make a copy, toss those files, after pain an aggravation you'll understand.



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Brian Barkley
Re: Sony EX-3 records five files
on Mar 10, 2009 at 8:20:25 pm

You remind me of my old man . . when I was a kid, he beat the hell out of me when I asked him a simple question.



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Craig Seeman
Re: Sony EX-3 records five files
on Mar 10, 2009 at 8:51:22 pm

[Brian Barkley] "You remind me of my old man . . when I was a kid, he beat the hell out of me when I asked him a simple question."

Better me than your client. That'll cost you a lot more.

As I said follow the workflow. Then make a copy and remove those files and try the workflow again. Make sure you start with a nice long clip that fills two cards so the metadata plays an important role.

The simple answer to the simple question is backup everything. It's your camera master.



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Brian Barkley
Re: Sony EX-3 records five files
on Mar 10, 2009 at 9:16:55 pm

I have no clients. I work alone on the plains of Kansas. I am new to the tapeless world, with only manuals to refer, and they are not always so helpful.

I am an absolute dummy when it comes to the technical part the video world, both camera and NLE. I get by with my creative juices, and manage to sell 30,000 or more DVDs annually. I rely on people with brains who think technically, which is why forums like these are good for people like me.




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Craig Seeman
Re: Sony EX-3 records five files
on Mar 10, 2009 at 9:43:41 pm

When in doubt take the most conservative approach. Save everything. Assuming Sony had the camera record those files for a reason.

[Brian Barkley] "I rely on people with brains who think technically, which is why forums like these are good for people like me. "

That's why I say the first thing is workflow, not files.
One doesn't have to know how the engine works to be a good driver. One also doesn't toss out parts of the engine even if one doesn't know what all the parts do. Assume the manufacturer had a purpose in putting it there.

It's not always about understanding the technology but a mindset one has when dealing with the unknown. Do read the links Clint points to.





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Clint Fleckenstein
Re: Sony EX-3 records five files
on Mar 11, 2009 at 2:44:00 pm

"That's why I say the first thing is workflow, not files."

I'll have to shout out a big Amen on this one. At our little company, everybody gets a weekly "one-on-one" with our manager to chat about how things are going in and out of the office. This morning was my turn, and one thing that I brought up is that we need to train/retrain our folks with tapeless. You're going to have to come up with a good standard operating procedure and follow it now, since you don't have tapes to throw into a box for later. It's also going to require some technical knowledge, but as you get into this I'd worry more about concepts first and details later.

Our shooters are young, which has its good and bad points. It means they don't have 20 years of habits to break, but sadly college doesn't teach much regarding workflow. There are blessings and curses in starting with a blank slate. In this case, I'm trying to share technical knowledge with them so we can brainstorm our workflow together. I spent most of my time in this business on the control room and edit bay side of things, so I'm stronger on the nuts & bolts stuff than on the videography. I'm also totally neurotic when it comes to archiving, which has saved our butts on numerous occasions. That's why, when it came to going tapeless, I made workflow and archiving the #1 factor driving our decisions in purchasing. Due to the nature of our work, it's a certainty that an occasional project will need to be "resurrected" for updates.

Back to our morning discussion: the days of bringing footage back, throwing the tapes into the safe, and logging etc. "when we have time" are over. Tape gave us the opportunity to be lax in some areas where shooting files is less forgiving. To some it might seem like tapeless is more work; I'm more of the opinion that tapeless requires a diligence that denies you the same opportunities for bad habits (such as procrastinating) that tape allows. Before the fact that we're a small shop and very busy crew became an excuse to put off some things...now there simply is no room for that unless we want a real mess later.

Now that we've beaten you over the head with the "archive your BPAV" jawbone, it's time to suggest that you figure out a game plan. Since you work alone, you know your business better than anyone else. Figure out answers to questions like "how can I store these files after shooting so I can make sense of them while editing?" or "how am I going to archive this footage for use down the road, as unlikely as that may be?" At least you've already started thinking this way, or you wouldn't have asked that question about which files to save in the first place. That'll save you a lot of headaches down the road.

I'd love to just sit down and reflect on our learning curve on this stuff, even though we're really just getting into it too. We have done a lot of "little" projects with our XDCAM gear but nothing on the scale of our larger projects. Jobs like that come and go in a cyclical pattern, so that gives us plenty of opportunity to learn on the small stuff before the big jobs start coming around in the spring. Hopefully you'll have the same opportunity.

Cf


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Clint Fleckenstein
Re: Sony EX-3 records five files
on Mar 10, 2009 at 9:33:34 pm

Let's reboot this thread. Brian, I suggest you scroll down to the following threads:

"Whats a good reason to keep Bpav folders after exporting to MXF?"

"Should I archive MXF or Native XDCAM files?"

"EX-1 Footage Issue - I only have the clips"

Those will help put things into perspective. Bottom line, you should keep every BPAV folder intact. Nest it in a folder with a more descriptive title. If you rename that folder, or mess around with its contents, you're in the hurtlocker.

Hope this helps. And we really are helpful around here, it's just that we get this question a lot. Welcome!

Cf


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Mitch Lewis
Re: Sony EX-3 records five files
on Mar 11, 2009 at 3:53:22 pm

Here is our workflow Brian. We use Apple Final Cut Pro.

1) Plug camera into computer via USB (or use Express Card adaptor if you have one)
2) Plug in your portable hard drive for archiving
3) Launch XDCAM EX Clip Browser
4) In the Clip Browser software, set up two windows; one window shows your SxS card contents, the other window shows the root level of your portable hard drive
5) In the Clip Browser software, create a new folder on your hard drive and label it appropriately
6) In the Clip Browser software, select all your clips and drag them from your SxS card window into your newly created folder on your portable hard drive.
7) Eject your SxS card and insert another one if necessary, then repeat step 6, dragging all the additional clips into the same folder on your portable hard drive. This will also automatically link any clips that have spanned two SxS cards.
8) Launch the XDCAM Transfer Software
9) Click the Add button at the bottom and navigate to the folder you created in step 5
10) Thumbnails of all your clips should now appear
11) One by one, select each clip (or a group of clips) and name them. You do this by clicking on the Information tab, and then naming them within the Clip window (not the Source window). You can name one clip at a time or select a group of clips and name them all the same thing. If you choose the latter, a consecutive number will be assigned at the end of each name.
12) You can also mark and IN/OUT for a clip, shortening it's length. This creates a Subclip and can sae you storage space if you don't need to import an entire clip (you only need part of it).
13) (This is the part I think is poorly designed) Go to the XDCAM Transfer Preferences and click on the Import tab.
14) Under "Import Location" click the Browse button and navigate where you want your clips to be stored (like on a RAID or other fast hard drive....not your portable drive, it's probably not fast enough)
15) Finally, select all your clips (command+A) and click on Import button at the bottom right of the screen.
16) After a few minutes all your clips will be converted into proper MOV clips ready to edit in Final Cut Pro or another Apple based editing program. (iMovie, Premiere, etc...)



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