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Artimus
HD Field Production
on Jul 17, 2005 at 1:35:28 am

Hi,

If going to do wildlife shows on HD CAM at game parks for about 4 to 5 days-- probably using the Sony HDW 700A or 730-- does one have to take a vector scope and waveform monitor along? Or will just a good field monitor do?
If you feel one has to take them along-- would you explain why?

Anyone have any idea how much the Sony HDW 700A used to sell for new before being discontinued?

Thanks-- Artimus



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tony salgado
Re: HD Field Production
on Jul 17, 2005 at 5:45:25 pm



Unless you have a DIT or VC along with you to shade via a wfm (color correct and set exposure) you can shoot ENG style by using the zebras in the viewfinder for setting exposure. If you intend to do all your color correction in post then shooting ENG style is quite fine.

The waveform would be useful to avoid clipping or crushing blacks but you could train yourself to read the zebras properly for avoiding clipping whites.


The 9" monitors are low res and are only really useful for crash and burn situtions where size and weight and DC power are an issue.

If your have ac available and are not running around alot the minimum size I prefer is a 14" but my favorite is a 20" HD monitor.


Used 700A are going for under 35K.

In my opinion buying an interlace camera such as the 700A is not a wise idea at this time as the next generation of HDCAM camcorders (XDCAM HD) is around the corner. Unless of course you have a job that will pay off the camera in less than a year and you can sell the camera for a decent return.



Tony Salgado


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laguun
Re: HD Field Production
on Jul 17, 2005 at 8:08:02 pm

[Artimus] "If going to do wildlife shows on HD CAM at game parks for about 4 to 5 days-- probably using the Sony HDW 700A or 730-- does one have to take a vector scope and waveform monitor along?"

No need for vector/wave if you a) have a decent postproductiond and b) avoid pure white and black (knee and blackgamma are the settings in the 730s you want to use for this).

[Artimus] "Or will just a good field monitor do?"

Even better - the colorviewfinder HDVFC 30 is the part no. i think but i am not sure if its working on the 730s.

[Artimus] "If you feel one has to take them along-- would you explain why?"

a) shooting with several cameras - alignement.
b) live broadcast
c) colorcorrection on set (which isn


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john sharaf
Re: HD Field Production
on Jul 17, 2005 at 10:30:36 pm

For lightweight, nimble location HD shooting a 8.4" Panasonic LCD is an excellent accessory. Not only does it provide a very lightweight and compact monitor, but it also has a useful built-in waveform feature, which some folks (me included) find very useful in setting exposure. This unit is very helpful in checking white balance as well.

Good shooting!

JS


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Michael Brennan
Re: HD Field Production
on Jul 18, 2005 at 12:38:03 am

If you have shot on video before then zebras will be ok.
Focus will be your big issue.
If you are thinking of buying a used 700, I know there are a few in South Africa doing wildlife, be aware that the viewfinder is probably getting soft, not what you need shooting wildlife on HD.

730 has only one filter wheel which is a bit of a drawback for the sunny climates.

Best thing is to learn as you go by replaying on at least 14inch crt or 1920X1080 LCD.
Do as much testing/shooting before you go if you can't get this kit on location.

I'd value a 700a at about US$17-22k. This could drop to $12k within 18 months.

Mike



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lagoon
Re: HD Field Production
on Jul 18, 2005 at 9:27:09 am

[Michael Brennan] "Focus will be your big issue."

i have to agree - hd focus (especially with long angles) is 35mm level work. especially those fast moving animals which tend to change directions are pretty hard to keep focussed.

[Michael Brennan] "730 has only one filter wheel which is a bit of a drawback for the sunny climates."

big drawback also for depth of field - its enjoyable to have two ND filters in front and behind the optics.

[Michael Brennan] "Best thing is to learn as you go by replaying on at least 14inch crt or 1920X1080 LCD.
Do as much testing/shooting before you go if you can't get this kit on location."


100% agreed.

[Michael Brennan] "I'd value a 700a at about US$17-22k. This could drop to $12k within 18 months."

and a warning - there are still 1035line 700s around - we almost bought one (very cheap, 14K) and found out last minute that it was a 1035 model.



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Artimus
Re: HD Field Production
on Jul 18, 2005 at 12:12:42 pm

Thanks for your feedback guys. It is very helpful and informative.

A few things which were mentioned that I am really a little unclear about--

"Viewfinder has gone soft"-- Do viewfinders go soft? Or is that some kind of expression which means something else?

"The 730 has only one filter wheel" --Is the same true of the HDW 700A?

"There are some Sony 700's around which are 1035 line"-- Does this mean, as opposed to 1080? Was there an HDW 700 before the 700A? If so, are they the ones in which some are 1035? Or do some of the 700A's have 1080 or 1035?

Thanks again--- Art



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tony salgado
Re: HD Field Production
on Jul 21, 2005 at 3:15:58 am



In most camera models the "A" is the 2nd generation release.

In this case yes the 700 applies to the 1035 model versus the 700A which is 1080i.

You can upgrade a 700 from 1035 to 1080i. I don't know the cost or is the upgrade kit is still available.

Viewfinders over the course of many years do go soft. However depending on the age of the 700 the viewfinder may still be fine.

In anycase even if the viewfinder is too soft and the camera is fine you can consider getting a new viewfinder.



Tony Salgado


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