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how to author a high quality DVD to fit on one disc

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Carly Smithhow to author a high quality DVD to fit on one disc
by on Apr 1, 2011 at 10:23:57 pm

Hi all -

I am editing sports events into DVD, with sweeps, lower thirds,titles, credits.

I want to export the highest quality settings I can that will fit onto a single DVD - the same way I would for a retail DVD.
Using Adobe Premiere CS4
If I choose MPEG2-DVD, and set the quality to the maximum (5)
NTSC

29.97 drop frame upper, VBR 1
Bitrate settings: 80,80, 80

The expected output size is 137,825 Mb or 13 Gb

How do the pros export such high quality to a single DVD?

Suggestions highly appreciated - thanks in advance


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Noah KadnerRe: how to author a high quality DVD to fit on one disc
by on Apr 2, 2011 at 4:17:27 am

What's the length? Here's a tool for estimating the best bitrate to fit on a disc for a specific runtime:

http://www.videohelp.com/calc.htm

-Noah

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Michael SloweRe: how to author a high quality DVD to fit on one disc
by on Apr 2, 2011 at 12:15:33 pm

If you use BitVice, (in my opinion a first class DVD encoder) you get the file size indicated automatically as you slide your bit rate up and down. I use an average VBR with double pass in BitVice, I've had over 80 minutes on a single disc but can't remember the bit rate.

Michael Slowe


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eric pautschRe: how to author a high quality DVD to fit on one disc
by on Apr 2, 2011 at 12:47:00 pm

80 Mins isnt a whole lot either. You can put much more than that with a good encoder and a little know how tricks



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Michael SloweRe: how to author a high quality DVD to fit on one disc
by on Apr 2, 2011 at 2:08:32 pm

Eric, I didn't say that 80 minutes was anything special, I merely stated what I had done. Of course, depending on bit rate a disc will hold a great deal more. It's the quality that matters surely.

Michael Slowe


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Carly SmithRe: how to author a high quality DVD to fit on one disc
by on Apr 2, 2011 at 2:18:08 pm

The sporting event is 03;55;27;29 or 423415 frames.

I guess I'm looking at 2 DVDs regardless...

so now the question is - can anyone recommend a good dual-layer DVD stock to master on that is compatible with many players across the board?


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Dave HaynieRe: how to author a high quality DVD to fit on one disc
by on Apr 2, 2011 at 4:02:32 pm

[Carly Smith] "I want to export the highest quality settings I can that will fit onto a single DVD - the same way I would for a retail DVD."

I don't know anything about Premiere itself (last used it well over ten years ago). But the best quality one usually get using consumer/prosumer tools is done this way: get yourself a bitrate calculator. Enter the length of the video and the type of audio you want (most likely AC-3 for a sporting event, perhaps PCM for a concert or some other event in which audio is more critical). The calculator (you can Google and find dozens if not hundreds) will figure out the maximum bitrate you can use for encoding your video in order to fit on the selected media type (DVD5 or DVD9).

Once you have that, you want to set that birate as the average encoding rate. Set a higher bitrate as peak, somewhere between 50% and 100% higher, but don't exceed 8Mb/s or so, there's rarely any need. Set the minimum bitrate to 1/2-1/4 of your peak or less. Then encode. If your encoder does VBR well, your final video will fit. You can also use this technique to encode multiple segments, as long as you add up the times. If it doesn't fit, your encoder may not be so accurate at VBR, so try again, scaling back your average based on the overrun.

[Carly Smith] "How do the pros export such high quality to a single DVD?"

A commercial DVD is encoded by a mastering engineer. They have workstations with realtime variable bitrate MPEG-2 encoders, and other tools. For example, in very fast motion scenes, you may see MPEG-2 block artifacts (one reason I like to do my sports videos in Blu-ray... I can use 60p rather than 60i, better for sports). These are the results of too many differences between each I-Frame and the subsequent P and B frames in the MPEG-2 stream. An encoding engineer can selectively apply low-pass filters (eg, well designed blur) to lower the amount of information on the whole picture, and thus, avoid the MPEG-2 artifacts. If you study the action scenes in any commercial film, you'll find the birate goes up, but in fast motion, there's also substantial blur added... which your eye ignores, while the emergent edges in the DCT macroblock compression overload is parsed by your brain as horizontal and vertical lines... something we're hardwired to detect.

In short, the top tier pros do this by eye, with very powerful tools that make this a reasonable thing to do. We don't have those tools, and have to count on algorithms to produce the best results. But very certainly, the one you can do is use the available space on the DVD to your advantage... any unused room is not contributing to a better image.

-Dave


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