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Graphics package

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Tim KennedyGraphics package
by on Jan 18, 2008 at 12:20:07 am

New to this forum, Just wanted to get a sence of what a Graphics package is for a broadcast designer. i.e. a show open, bumbers, tansitions, lower thirds.
So what is a "graphics Package"
this would be for a cable show, and hour in length.
Also wanted to get an idea of what to charge for a graphic package from design to final render.

Thanks


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Joseph W. BourkeRe: Graphics package
by on Jan 28, 2008 at 6:42:49 pm

Hi Tim -
The answer to "what is a graphics package?" is a bit similar to the answer to "what does a house cost?". There are so many variables, and, in general, it is the Producer's job to delineate the needs for the show. The station I work at is notoriously lax in laying out the needs for the show up front, so most of the time, I'm the producer.

Generally speaking though, I will create an open (times vary from four to five seconds to thirty seconds), bump (four to ten seconds long), rejoin (four to ten seconds long), lower third (usually animated-also could be a one line or two line), chip (a shortened lower third occupying either the right or left twenty or thirty percent of the screen), full screen graphic (animated background for text and information overlays), and a few stills incorporating key elements of the design, which can be used in full screens, over the shoulder graphics, etc..

Since I am on salary it would be tough to come up with a price for the full package, because it depends on how long and complex the above elements are, and how quickly I work on any given day. I would suggest coming up with an hourly rate, then figuring out roughly what any one of the above elements you need would take in hours, then tacking on at least a twenty-five percent contingency fee for the changes you know are going to come along with the job (or profit you want to make). In my case, since I am the Producer most of the time, my client (News or Promotions) will come in when I'm almost done and say either "we love it!" or "oh...that's not what we had in mind...", having given me no input upfront other than the title of the show. The more you are left to your own devices the more freedom you have with the visual concept, but usually this indicates the client's lack of previsualiation skills (and this means changes, changes, changes).

You most definitely want to get some "serious" money up front. This will weed out the tire-kickers. Generally a third of total quoted up front, a third at the mid way approval stage, and a third BEFORE final delivery of tape or media.

Good luck!

Joe Bourke
Art Director / WMUR-TV


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Tim KennedyRe: Graphics package
by on Jan 29, 2008 at 2:54:13 pm

Joe,

Thank you for your response, it was very informative and answered so many question. If I can pick your brain for a few more questions.
What is a Rejoin? Also, I'm a Animator and motion graphics person, my background is in film and documentary. I'm not a graphic designer nor have studied graphic design. I do have a good sense of design and the moving image. How much time do you spend on design? Do you present graphic treatments to the client for approval before you start animating? Do you hire Graphic Designers? For someone like me would you suggest me hiring a designer to create the look and adding that cost into the price?

Also, I had a question about using stock images within your design. I know some design housed have libraries of stock images to pull from to add to the design and look of graphics packages. Who pays for the use of stock images within the design package? example. if a show is about George Washington, and I want to use a famous picture of GW in my show open, do I have to pay for the rights to use that picture? And how do you incorporate that into the cost of the graphics package? Now, I'm usually stuck with the images that the client provides. The clients have the rights to use them for the show, but it limits me in the images I can use to create a dynamic open.

Thanks again for your response.

tim


Kino Pravda


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Joseph W. BourkeRe: Graphics package
by on Jan 29, 2008 at 8:14:18 pm

Hi Tim -
A rejoin is an element that brings you back into the show from a commercial break. Think of a show that might use a trivia question as the bump, then the answer is presented in the rejoin, forcing you to stick around and hopefully continue watching the show. You use the bump to take you out to the commercial, and the rejoin to bring you back in.

I spend a large amount of my time on design; many of my projects start with a logo design and develop from there to the motion graphics. Since my clients are internal, in other words, I work for our News department, Promotions department, and Sales department, I'm not really working for an outside client. I don't have to quote on my time, I just give them an idea of what my turnaround time will be, based on their request and air deadline. As I mentioned in my last post, many of the people I work with are visually "challenged", so I end up being the Producer, which gives me a lot of freedom.

When I need another Designer on the project because of tight time constraints, I will pull in one of our other on staff design people, and we'll share the load.

Now and then I will use stock footage or licensed stills (usually from Corbis). If it's footage I need, I just buy a collection from Artbeats or some other collection; that way we own the footage for future use on other projects. When I'm doing a set design for a special, I will license a high resolution shot of what I need from Corbis, and we pay the licensing fee. You definitely want to pass the licensing fee on to the client, whether it's a one-time usage or the cost of a collection on disc.

Joe Bourke
Art Director / WMUR-TV



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Kudzai KativuRe: Graphics package
by on Mar 25, 2009 at 7:13:07 pm

Hi Joe Burke. Just wanted to say thanks for the great description. It's really helpful to know the breakdown of how to divide up a package for the client.


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