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Content questions for a new era?

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Bill DavisContent questions for a new era?
by on Aug 31, 2012 at 5:16:43 am

Was watching an internet thing about author William Gibson and stumbled onto this guys YouTube channel.

Found it fascinating. I haven't really seen anything like this on TV outside a local TV show that aggregates the top stuff off the web.

This is different, to my thinking.

It's personal commentary from a hipster host assembled with rapid fire net imagery into a "channel" perhaps seeking to build an audience base using a contemporary form of semi-kenetic video collage.

It's also interesting because part of what he's talking about is how this new user generated content is competing in a parallel space with traditional content - noting that the internet memes about stuff like rhythmic gymnastics at the recent olympics actually may have gained MORE viewers on the web then the events themselves.

Don't know quite what to think about it, but I though I'd put it out there for comment.







"Before speaking out ask yourself whether your words are true, whether they are respectful and whether they are needed in our civil discussions."-Justice O'Connor


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Steve ConnorRe: Content questions for a new era?
by on Aug 31, 2012 at 8:42:37 am

Interesting thoughts, I'm not sure this competes or is any sort of threat to what we all do though.

Steve Connor
'It's just my opinion, with an occasional fact thrown in for good measure"


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Rich RubaschRe: Content questions for a new era?
by on Aug 31, 2012 at 2:19:47 pm

He uses "technological singularity" and elevates that to "cultural singularity" but simplified further (since humans are the ones sharing and populating the web with all their "yuck") I posit:

Superficial Human Singularity

Until it evolves to a state that actually contributes positively to the human condition, whereas it can be named simply:

Human Singularity

Rich Rubasch
Tilt Media Inc.
Video Production, Post, Studio Sound Stage
Founder/President/Editor/Designer/Animator
http://www.tiltmedia.com


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Chris HarlanRe: Content questions for a new era?
by on Aug 31, 2012 at 4:24:56 pm

Its a poor argument framed with slight of hand. There's no "singularity" here. Because memes appear to the casual viewer to--poof--appear out of nowhere, does not mean that they do. The memes are not being created by "the Internet," even though that might appear to someone to be the case, but are actually the byproduct of millions of sweaty human hands, thinking that their friends will think what they are doing is funny. That is an obvious fact, but the guy jumps right over it.


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Jeremy GarchowRe: Content questions for a new era?
by on Sep 1, 2012 at 4:39:28 pm

[Chris Harlan] "but the guy jumps right over it."

I must ressurrect this in all of its relevancy:



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Chris HarlanRe: Content questions for a new era?
by on Sep 1, 2012 at 4:49:54 pm

Hee hee. You know, he could double as the for the X in FCP X.


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Christian SchumacherRe: Content questions for a new era?
by on Sep 1, 2012 at 5:11:21 pm

[Bill Davis] "It's personal commentary from a hipster host assembled with rapid fire net imagery into a "channel" perhaps seeking to build an audience base using a contemporary form of semi-kenetic video collage."

Funny that insightful video brilliantly wrapped-up just like zillions of gossip-magazine-reality-show-vlog-social-media-world-wide-web-style... -Cool story, bro! -Bookmarking! -Now! -NOT!

Here's a true example of extraordinary user input on youtube [irony off]:







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Bill DavisRe: Content questions for a new era?
by on Sep 1, 2012 at 8:13:09 pm

Since my point seemed to escape some - I didn't post this as a "look at how brilliant these ideas are" deal. I posted it because I'm interested in, and trying to track a bit about what video is "becoming" on the web.

This piece interested me because its an example of two things. It represents how low the barrier has become regarding the ability for any individual to access an audience. (Everyone here can see it at will, at no additional cost.)

And how it relies on nothing more than a sophisticated use of "home made" video technology. It's got more structure and intent then the average cat video (tho nothing wrong with those - people love cats and have every right to express themselves too) but doesn't rely on anything the modern consumer laptop can't do.

It's modern video as a personal platform rather than as one the REQUIRES a business or corporate budget and therefore a management vetting to exist.

The thing that's struck me MOST about this posting experiment, is how everyone appears to be concentrating on the CONTENT rather than issues of production. Which just means that we've fully entered an era where a DSLR and laptop can create content indistinguishable from standard classic TV production - and that we're truly down to content quality being remaining separator - rather than access to specialist tools.

That's all it is. Nothing more or less. A nascent new environment developing with the potential to aggregate an audience.

Period.

Appreciate the comments from all.

"Before speaking out ask yourself whether your words are true, whether they are respectful and whether they are needed in our civil discussions."-Justice O'Connor


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Chris HarlanRe: Content questions for a new era?
by on Sep 2, 2012 at 3:03:31 am

[Bill Davis] "Since my point seemed to escape some - I didn't post this as a "look at how brilliant these ideas are" deal. I posted it because I'm interested in, and trying to track a bit about what video is "becoming" on the web.
"


So, your point is that a video like this is somehow new?


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Jeremy GarchowRe: Content questions for a new era?
by on Sep 2, 2012 at 3:13:51 am

I feel like it would fail the Harding Test.


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Chris HarlanRe: Content questions for a new era?
by on Sep 2, 2012 at 4:21:14 am

Crikey! A seizure-inducing Internet with no Harding test to stop it. I've always wondered whether there was an actual series of seizures that the Harding was developed to stop, or whether its always been a better-safe-than-sorry hypothetical. Any of you Brits have hard Harding evidence?


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Rafael AmadorRe: Content questions for a new era?
by on Sep 2, 2012 at 4:29:30 am

What I found here is that speeding a voice up, an empty message may sounds like something interesting.
Apart of that, old school video production, well planned and executed.
what I like is the records covers on the background. Good memories.
rafael

http://www.nagavideo.com


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Bill DavisRe: Content questions for a new era?
by on Sep 2, 2012 at 6:58:47 pm

[Chris Harlan] "So, your point is that a video like this is somehow new?"

No Chris.

The video is not what's new and frankly, I'm surprised that you aren't getting the point. The content is not new at all. The development of tremendous numbers of content streams outside broadcast that are succeeding in building their own niche audiences - combined with a robust business model (YouTube, et al) that allows them to find and mine that audience for revenue IS pretty new.

You can filter it as, "it's not new" just as you can filter that email is not new, since it's just the post office with a few computer twists. And Facebook is just the grocery store bulletin board with a few computer twists. And iTunes is just a record store with a few computer twists. None of these are "new" in a fundamental way. But fortunes are being made in all these areas by people who aren't getting stuck with the "is it really new?" trap. And trying to figure out what about it IS new and might be worth understanding.

I like trying to understand change. I can't find any interest (or profit, really) in simply resisting it or dismissing it out of hand.

You may not be curious as to what's happening in examples like I posted. But I am. And I suspect that others here are as well.

I'm not holding them up as "better" than anything else. Just seeing things that make me feel that the development of skills and sophistication which happened in the early days of TV (when it was the ONLY game in town) are now happening in the web video space.

The cute cat videos are giving way to something else.

I think that's worth discussing.

If you don't that's fine.

"Before speaking out ask yourself whether your words are true, whether they are respectful and whether they are needed in our civil discussions."-Justice O'Connor


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Liam HallRe: Content questions for a new era?
by on Sep 2, 2012 at 7:22:26 pm

[Bill Davis] "he development of tremendous numbers of content streams outside broadcast that are succeeding in building their own niche audiences - combined with a robust business model (YouTube, et al) that allows them to find and mine that audience for revenue IS pretty new."

Bill, what do you mean by "new"? Many of my clients have had their own YouTube channel for years, even the White House has had one since 2009.

Liam Hall
Director/DoP/Editor
http://www.liamhall.net


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Bill DavisRe: Content questions for a new era?
by on Sep 3, 2012 at 12:30:38 am

[Liam Hall] "Bill, what do you mean by "new"? Many of my clients have had their own YouTube channel for years, even the White House has had one since 2009."

So, from 1952 to 2008 (or 07, 06, same point) it was one way.

And from 2008 to today it's been another way.

That's a pretty darn good definition of "new" in my book.

"Before speaking out ask yourself whether your words are true, whether they are respectful and whether they are needed in our civil discussions."-Justice O'Connor


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Liam HallRe: Content questions for a new era?
by on Sep 3, 2012 at 7:38:41 am

[Bill Davis] "And from 2008 to today it's been another way.

That's a pretty darn good definition of "new" in my book."


We clearly have different books:)

It's often said that a week is long time in politics, but For the twitter generation a week is an eternity, just ask the Kony2012 people...

For the record, YouTube started in 2005.

Liam Hall
Director/DoP/Editor
http://www.liamhall.net


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Chris HarlanRe: Content questions for a new era?
by on Sep 3, 2012 at 2:42:13 am

[Bill Davis] "[Chris Harlan] "So, your point is that a video like this is somehow new?"

No Chris.

The video is not what's new and frankly, I'm surprised that you aren't getting the point. "


That's because the point(s) you are trying to make seem(s) quite fluid and has(have) apparently altered some from your original post. So, no, I don't get the point you are trying to make; perhaps when you eventually arrive there, you will share.

[Bill Davis] "I like trying to understand change. I can't find any interest (or profit, really) in simply resisting it or dismissing it out of hand.

You may not be curious as to what's happening in examples like I posted. But I am. And I suspect that others here are as well.
"


Why do you think I'm dismissing change out of hand? I don't see anything here that hasn't been happening for the last half decade or more. I'm just not sure what you are trying to discuss here, or why this piece is somehow an example of something new. From a geological perspective, its quite new. Otherwise, not so much.


[Bill Davis] "I'm not holding them up as "better" than anything else. Just seeing things that make me feel that the development of skills and sophistication which happened in the early days of TV (when it was the ONLY game in town) are now happening in the web video space.
"


This would be a terrific observation in 2006-07. And I think everybody who posts here would have agreed with this several or more years ago. Not that its no longer worth talking about, but thats not how you phrased it.


[Bill Davis] "The cute cat videos are giving way to something else.
"


Don't think so. They'll still be around. As to the available bevy of other more serious, or more ably produced things--there is a lot of that too.


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Liam HallRe: Content questions for a new era?
by on Sep 2, 2012 at 9:17:53 am

[Bill Davis] "Since my point seemed to escape some - I didn't post this as a "look at how brilliant these ideas are" deal. I posted it because I'm interested in, and trying to track a bit about what video is "becoming" on the web."

Video on the internet isn't becoming anything. The internet has always been a repository for everything good, bad, indifferent or illegal. All content is there from skateboarding dogs and the latest Hollywood movies to dwarf pole-dancers and annoying, self-gratifying commentators like the one you posted.

Liam Hall
Director/DoP/Editor
http://www.liamhall.net


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Bill DavisRe: Content questions for a new era?
by on Sep 3, 2012 at 12:43:00 am

[Liam Hall] "Video on the internet isn't becoming anything. The internet has always been a repository for everything good, bad, indifferent or illegal. All content is there from skateboarding dogs and the latest Hollywood movies to dwarf pole-dancers and annoying, self-gratifying commentators like the one you posted.
"


Well, we'll have to disagree here.

I think it's becoming a new global force. For decades we got what the networks fed us. Then we got what networks and cable fed us. Now we have a portal to a worldwide base of content that sinks or swims in a new global pond of possibility.

Exhibit "A" might be the attached video - with 89 MILLION plus world wide YouTube views. Seems to me that outranks "Who Shot JR?" and the latest American Idol by quite a distance.

There's no way this would have run on US network TV. Probably not cable either. And if you'd asked me about the state of South Korean video production I probably would have laughed it off as "irrelevant" before I saw this. But they've clearly schooled themselves on decades of US cultural content export - and have some interesting cultrual twists to add. But you can't fault their production quality much.

(it gets weirder and weirder and weirder - and by the end you can't get the damn song out of your brain - pretty much the perfect pop entertainment!)

Enjoy.







"Before speaking out ask yourself whether your words are true, whether they are respectful and whether they are needed in our civil discussions."-Justice O'Connor


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David LawrenceRe: Content questions for a new era?
by on Sep 3, 2012 at 3:09:58 am

[Bill Davis] "I think it's becoming a new global force. For decades we got what the networks fed us. Then we got what networks and cable fed us. Now we have a portal to a worldwide base of content that sinks or swims in a new global pond of possibility."

Nonsense, Bill. Everyone knows it's a series of tubes.







_______________________
David Lawrence
art~media~design~research
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Liam HallRe: Content questions for a new era?
by on Sep 3, 2012 at 7:55:50 am

[Bill Davis] "I think it's becoming a new global force."

It's not becoming a global force, it already is one and has been for some time.

YouTube is old news. The debate has long since on moved on, it's now about the power of social media and mobile communications, about the speed that harnessing these technologies can empower people and force real change on a global level. It's not about Korean rappers or performing pets, it's about Syria, Iran and revolution...

Liam Hall
Director/DoP/Editor
http://www.liamhall.net


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Bill DavisRe: Content questions for a new era?
by on Sep 3, 2012 at 5:31:13 pm

[Liam Hall] "about the speed that harnessing these technologies can empower people and force real change on a global level."

This is what YOU think it's about. And you're right.

I think it's about that same quote, but with one change - the word global in the last line changed to personal.

My OP was trying to indicate that there's more ability to craft PERSONAL expression today.

The music video I posted was NOT about another high budget music video being produced. We've been inundated with that forever. It's about the fact that it's happening in South Korea in a form that's virtually indistinguishable from how it's happening in LA. Which means the PA in Korea who used to be "disconnected" from opportunity in a way that the PA in LA was not - is now on an equal footing. And either one, with a killer idea - can create something at 10am and have "access" to a worldwide audience at 10:05am.

The missing link has ALWAYS been marketing. And my original post was also trying to point out that there's a need to learn about how content develops a viral base in today's market. The sophistication of internet content is changing pretty rapidly - from cats to polished program. But NOT polished programs that come out of the 50th floor of a NYC building or the back lot in LA, but from everywhere and anywhere.

The message being pushed back at me here is "it's already a given" and "it's no big deal" and "it's not going to matter - but I think it does matter.

Because the ONLY thing that really matters in our entire industry is where the eyeballs end up.

That silly Korean guy (and his financiers and backers) had earned around 85 million pairs of eyeballs as of 3 days ago when I posted this. When I looked today, it's up to 93 million pairs.

In a world increasingly driven by Google Analytics rather than Arbitron - that can mean MONEY and SUCCESS right?

"Before speaking out ask yourself whether your words are true, whether they are respectful and whether they are needed in our civil discussions."-Justice O'Connor


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Herb SevushRe: Content questions for a new era?
by on Sep 3, 2012 at 8:54:35 pm

[Bill Davis] "The missing link has ALWAYS been marketing. And my original post was also trying to point out that there's a need to learn about how content develops a viral base in today's market. The sophistication of internet content is changing pretty rapidly - from cats to polished program. But NOT polished programs that come out of the 50th floor of a NYC building or the back lot in LA, but from everywhere and anywhere.

The message being pushed back at me here is "it's already a given" and "it's no big deal" and "it's not going to matter - but I think it does matter.

Because the ONLY thing that really matters in our entire industry is where the eyeballs end up."


Bill -

Everyone agrees with you, it's just that a lot of people agreed with what you are saying 3 years ago - posting it as "new" seems to cause some confusion.

For me the big question is how can you monetize this exposure in a consistent way? As long as the cyberverse continues to value spontaneity, novelty & randomness, it makes it hard to repeat success and create any kind of lasting value. The very act of being successful insures a degree of disapproval for a next effort, which is an amazing inversion of previous marketing patterns.

Herb Sevush
Zebra Productions
---------------------------
nothin' attached to nothin'
"Deciding the spine is the process of editing" F. Bieberkopf


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Richard HerdRe: Content questions for a new era?
by on Sep 2, 2012 at 5:39:05 pm

[Bill Davis] "we're truly down to content quality being remaining separator - rather than access to specialist tools."

And that's why everyday I go teach media production classes to at-risk high school students. (That and the fact that there's very little production work in Reno and my wife is in a PhD program till 2016.)

Here's one of the ads the kids made:



being run in our local market on MTV.

We shot on a Panny DVC20P and lit with Lowell lights that won't actually stand up and edited on PP 4.2 on Windows XP with 4GB RAM and a junky video card.

NOTE: With Perkins grant money I bought $10k in new equipment that will serve 125 kids this year.

Last week I started teaching "multimedia"; how to export video for the web and author html. I could not teach it fast enough. They actually put their phones down and paid attention! The running theme through the 2012 NACTE conference was "techno-literacy"; what I call video literacy: reading and writing motion picture content. The issue is a critical thinking problem; how do we tune out the bad and tune in the good?

(Feel free to donate a month of Adobe Creative Cloud. Thanks!)


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Rafael AmadorRe: Content questions for a new era?
by on Sep 3, 2012 at 6:16:50 am

[Bill Davis] "And if you'd asked me about the state of South Korean video production I probably would have laughed it off as "irrelevant" before I saw this. "
Normally the people in the USA don't know much about what's going on out of the USA (well, some times knows about the UK).
What many people don't realize is that nowadays there is more film/video production out of the USA than in the USA. and the gear and technology available to most companies in the USA is available out of the USA too, and I'm not talking about the most developed countries only. There are people shooting with RED (and postproducing accordingly) since in Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand and Indonesia (and now some Alexas too). Professionals with the same skills and ideas you could find anywhere else (George Lucas has 400 guys working in Singapore).
About quality, i guess the percentage of good-stuff/crap produced, probably is the same whatever the country of origin.
This korean video clip (and the 80 millions clicks) more than pointing out to the state of the Korean video production shows how the K-Pop (Google it) is sweeping all over East Asia

BTW, 80 millions plays don't mean 80 millions viewers. The kind of public for this stuff normally can play the same stuff over and over till they fry the computer or the smartphone.

http://www.nagavideo.com


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Bill DavisRe: Content questions for a new era?
by on Sep 3, 2012 at 5:45:31 pm

[Rafael Amador] "What many people don't realize is that nowadays there is more film/video production out of the USA than in the USA. "

I agree with you totally on this. I don't read much about production outside the US. But what I used to think of as something pretty much centered in Hollywood, NYC, London, and Mumbai - is now pretty diffused across the planet. Big change over a single generation.

[Rafael Amador] "his korean video clip (and the 80 millions clicks) more than pointing out to the state of the Korean video production shows how the K-Pop (Google it) is sweeping all over East Asia
"


And the resonance it had with my kid, I wouldn't be surprised if it becomes a little bit like the Beatles cultural revolution in the US. Not as powerful nor long lasting, certainly, but a bit of a cultural invasion none the less. Beatles to Graceland to K-Pop. Niche cultures that are less niche the more they succeed in media - but today we don't need George Martin or Paul Simon as the enabler. We've got YouTube.

"Before speaking out ask yourself whether your words are true, whether they are respectful and whether they are needed in our civil discussions."-Justice O'Connor


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Aindreas GallagherRe: Content questions for a new era?
by on Sep 5, 2012 at 11:15:47 pm

[Bill Davis] "I don't read much about production outside the US. But what I used to think of as something pretty much centered in Hollywood, NYC, London, and Mumbai - is now pretty diffused across the planet. Big change over a single generation."

no.

wrong.

how many fingers am i holding in front of you davies? truffaut, eisenstein kurosawa, reifenstahl (yes her) and god knows how many others . film has been everywhere for ever.


[Bill Davis] "I wouldn't be surprised if it becomes a little bit like the Beatles cultural revolution in the US. Not as powerful nor long lasting, certainly, but a bit of a cultural invasion none the less. Beatles to Graceland to K-Pop. Niche cultures that are less niche the more they succeed in media - but today we don't need George Martin or Paul Simon as the enabler. We've got YouTube."

mental point and utterly meaningless. horribly, horribly meaningless. who needed george martin? who ever thought thought that things happened by the grace of god with the right people coming together? was martin's relationship with the beatles something to be superceded by a h264 stream?

but yes, of course, we have youtube and FCPX - an editing system, I might remind you, that no one asked for, represents no advance, that I idiotically paid for, and that no one is using.

I boot it up every couple of days Bill, I try to get some semblance of mojo pushing stuff I shoot on my own time with it with a favourite track, but it is a horrible editing system bill.

there are no revelations, there is nothing to be discovered, it is simply a stupid, badly formed, unresponsive, drop shadow, chrome heavy, piece of stupid glitz that we need to forget about. all of us. there is nothing to figure out in FCPX, there is no insight it presents on its secondary storyline bull that I do not want to forget. immediately.

http://vimeo.com/user1590967/videos http://www.ogallchoir.net promo producer/editor.grading/motion graphics


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Bill DavisRe: Content questions for a new era?
by on Sep 12, 2012 at 2:58:20 am

[Aindreas Gallagher] "no.

wrong.

how many fingers am i holding in front of you davies? truffaut, eisenstein kurosawa, reifenstahl (yes her) and god knows how many others . film has been everywhere for ever."


Do you even READ english?

Did you notice the "I read" part of that. Or the "I think"

The english language is funny about things like this. When I say "I think" it's kinda stupid to respond "wrong" since only ONE of us actually knows what "I think."

I also admire those directors. But *I* have not been exposed to them at anything close to the level I've been exposed to Hollywood - or to NYC producion via daily network news and soaps. Or to the BBC (who's work I've admired via PBS for decades. Or to the Bollywood stuff I looked closely at for some parody stuff some years ago.

As much as you'd LOVE to assume that everyone is as enamored by global production diversity as you are - I'd wager that the truth of the matter is that most of the world wide viewership audience is VASTLY more parochial than most folk working inside the industry. My view is mine.

And just because you admire Leni over Orson (or anyone else foreign compared to Americans working in early film) isn't a particularly compelling argument against the fact that South Korea hasn't been anywhere close to the top of the global list of "production powerhouses" at any time in history. But now they've got a "number one with a bullet" piece of pop content.

In fact, there was a really cool piece on-line the last few days comparing postwar photographs of the South Korean landscape used in the Psy video to it's present form. It shows a pretty radical process of modern development - and clearly shows how SK has outstripped NK as a developing nation.

That's interesting to me. The fact that 50 years ago, a handful of other nations had exceptional movie makers isn't particularly relevant to that observation. I'm sure it's the language barrier, but I don't see hordes flocking to my local cineplex to watch modern german or dutch films.

I do see eyeballs flocking to the internet to view this South Korean one. That's pretty interesting... and read this closely.... TO ME.

(BTW, I know you operate on a level where details don't concern you, but there's no "e" in my last name. Ray Davies was a very cool pop musician, but not a relative.)

Take care.

"Before speaking out ask yourself whether your words are true, whether they are respectful and whether they are needed in our civil discussions."-Justice O'Connor


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Gav BottRe: Content questions for a new era?
by on Sep 3, 2012 at 6:36:26 am

The “good” content that’s there is like the comparison illustrations of human presence on the planet over time – a big model of a lighthouse with a hair on top that indicate the interesting bit.

How many hours of content are uploaded per day? (72 hours per minute according to Mr. YouTube) How much of it might as well be the honking of geese over pictures of cats? The bit you are picking as a ‘new” model is the hair on the top of the lighthouse – it’s also not what can be called new in terms of online evolution, in terms of all of human visual communication maybe, but there has been lots and lots of discussion on this for a good few years.

The Brit in Brisbane
The Pomme in Production - Brisbane Australia.


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tony westRe: Content questions for a new era?
by on Sep 4, 2012 at 12:57:34 pm

[Richard Herd] "that's why everyday I go teach media production classes to at-risk high school students."


Way to make a difference Richard : )


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Rafael AmadorRe: Content questions for a new era?
by on Sep 4, 2012 at 3:14:05 pm

The truth, Bill, is that the K-Pop is pure crap, but what is interesting is how Internet spreads that crap all around the globe and so fast.
Another interesting fact, is that South Korea is the country with more Internet connexion per capita in the World: 90% of the households.
rafael

http://www.nagavideo.com


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Jeremy GarchowRe: Content questions for a new era?
by on Sep 4, 2012 at 3:16:44 pm

[Rafael Amador] "The truth, Bill, is that the K-Pop is pure crap, but what is interesting is how Internet spreads that crap all around the globe and so fast. "

The speed is still amazing to me as well. It's truly like a wildfire.

I think that in the case of this particular video, the popularity is for the novelty of the video, not necessarily for the quality of the song/music.

It's weird, I don't particularly prefer the music, but it certainly looks polished.


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Rafael AmadorK-Pop
by on Sep 5, 2012 at 4:27:33 am

[Jeremy Garchow] "I think that in the case of this particular video, the popularity is for the novelty of the video, not necessarily for the quality of the song/music."
The truth, Jeremy, is that have been a mistake of me to tag this guy as K-Pop.
The video is funny (and well done) and the music, I think is OK for a party.
But just the age and look of the guy do not fit on the average K-pop.

K-Pop is more about a bunch of teen-like girls/boys (never trust the age of an asian lady by the look) and a lot of highly stylised wardrobe, make-up and choreography. Sequels of lab-designed bands like Spicy Girls or Back Street Boys.
I paste few examples. You can see that music doesn't matter. Is all about look, so they have to invest in the video clips.




























http://www.nagavideo.com


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Jeremy GarchowRe: K-Pop
by on Sep 5, 2012 at 2:08:48 pm

[Rafael Amador] "The truth, Jeremy, is that have been a mistake of me to tag this guy as K-Pop.
The video is funny (and well done) and the music, I think is OK for a party.
But just the age and look of the guy do not fit on the average K-pop."


Age has nothing to do with it, really. As a matter of fact, this is probably the best that K-Pop has to offer at the moment.

If Kylee Minogue can be considered mainstream pop, so can Psy! ;)


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