Creative COW SIGN IN :: SPONSORS :: ADVERTISING :: ABOUT US :: CONTACT US :: FAQ
Creative COW's LinkedIn GroupCreative COW's Facebook PageCreative COW on TwitterCreative COW's Google+ PageCreative COW on YouTube
FORUMS:listlist (w/ descriptions)archivetagssearchhall of famerecent posts

Can I get professional quality video (for broadcast) from a Canon T3i?

COW Forums : Canon EOS DSLR

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
Share on Facebook
Vic NoseworthyCan I get professional quality video (for broadcast) from a Canon T3i?
by on Oct 17, 2012 at 1:26:00 am

Hi folks,
I cut my teeth in digital video using Canon Vixia cameras. I'd heard that DSLR video could be used for broadcast quality video work, so I purchased a T3i. I've recently been told that the T3i is really of comparable quality to my HF M400 Vixia cameras (bokeh/depth-of-field issues aside). In fact, when editing the HF M400 and the T3i footage, side by side, I can easily see that both cameras are comparible, quality wise. I'm disappointed.
So, then, what part of the puzzle am I missing? Do the stories I've heard about using DSLRs for serious (broadcast) work refer to higher end DSLRs than the T3i? For example, does the 5D have a far better codec that yields a higher quality final output? Or, are there other issues I'm unaware of?
FYI: I'm using Final Cut Express 4, and I do a fair bit of compositing (I'm told compositing requires a robust codec). Would I get better output if I upgraded to Final Cut Pro 7?
Any advice you can offer will be very much appreciated! Thank you!
Vic


Return to posts index
Reply   Like  

Peter BurgerRe: Can I get professional quality video (for broadcast) from a Canon T3i?
by on Oct 17, 2012 at 10:21:13 am

[Vic Noseworthy] "Do the stories I've heard about using DSLRs for serious (broadcast) work refer to higher end DSLRs than the T3i? For example, does the 5D have a far better codec that yields a higher quality final output? Or, are there other issues I'm unaware of?"

No, all (Canon) DSLRs use the exact same codec. The more high-end cams do a bit better in low-light (bigger sensor, faster processor). Can't speak for the 5DIII though, since I don't have first-hand experience, but AFAIK it uses the same H.264 compression. Also can't speak for the Vixia cams in comparison with DSLRs.

We shot a lot of projects with the T2i, the 7D and 5DII (even alongside to each other) and IMHO picture quality is absolutely comparable if not identical (exception: low-light). The crucial point is glass. If you have good lenses IMHO it doesn't really matter which DSLR you use (Bokeh and DOF of the full-frame 5DII aside here, as well).

The problem with compositing is - as you wrote: You need a good codec.
H.264 in general is a bad codec for both: editing and compositing. H.264 with the Canons uses interframe compression with 4:2:0 colour-sampling, which means a lot of information is lost during compression. So you don't have much picture information left to work with.

If you transcode your footage before editing into a more editing-friendly intraframe lossless codec like ProRes, DNxHD, Cineform, etc. you'd most definitly notice an increase in editing speed and maybe stability of your NLE. But you won't notice any differences in quality, since transcoding won't add anything. It simply interpolates the missing frames which helps with both - editing and compositing.
So I don't think you'd get (much) better quality through updating your NLE. When I made the step from 32Bit Windows XP and Premiere CS3 to 64Bit Windows7 and Premiere CS5 it gave me much higher editing speed and the ability to work with the native footage, but no quality improvement (other than being able to render more filters like "Denoiser" etc. in less time...)

Just my two cents.

Edit: One more thing comparing composition: When working in After Effects, be sure to use 16Bit mode rather than 8Bit. This can (depending on your footage and project) increase quality quite dramatically.

Could you describe, what exactly it is, your disappointed with? What are the "quality critera" you're missing from your DSLR footage. Maybe it's just a matter of settings and (I can't stress this enough) lenses...

------------------------------------------
"Tragedy is a close-up; comedy, a long shot." - Buster Keaton

Me on Twitter (english/german)
http://twitter.com/FastFoodVideo


Return to posts index
Reply   Like  
+1

Vic NoseworthyRe: Can I get professional quality video (for broadcast) from a Canon T3i?
by on Oct 17, 2012 at 2:39:24 pm

Peter,
Thank you so much for taking time to explain this. I didn't know that all the Canon DSLRs used the same codec. As for other factors (specifically, lenses), I have a nice Canon EF 1:1.4 lens which I've been using almost exclusively (paid about $400 for it).
The quality issue(s) I speak of are in the final output quality (to DVD). FYI: I just got into shooting weddings.
For years, I have worked with what most refer to as "prosumer" camcorders. The Vixias are single-chip AVCHD cameras. The latest have really nice PRO sensors (only one CMOS sensor); still, they are truly amazing in low light, especially for a $700-800 camera.
I know these cameras cannot compare with, say, a 3-CCD professional camera. I thought about upgrading to one of these professional camcorders, but with all the talk about DSLRs, I decided to go that route. Plus, I absolutely love the control over DOF (I think no single factor does more to give a cinematic look than bokeh!)
Recently, I was at a wedding trade show, where I could observe my competition's image quality as compared to mine (many competitors had their sample videos playing on, like, a 52-inch television). I've checked out the equipment used by most of the local wedding videographers and, almost invariably, they use professional 3-chip camcorders.
The image quality that I get with my single chip prosumer camcorders seems, to me, quite comparable to what I am getting from my T3i. In fact, as I mentioned in my original post, I was told that the cameras (T3i and Vixia) yield similar image quality. If this is true, why do I so often hear that DSLRs can be used for broadcast? Wouldn't a 3-chip camcorder yield a "stronger" (more robust) image than a DSLR?
Here's the difference that I see between my DSLR wedding videos and my competitors' 3-chip camcorder wedding videos: On larger TV screens, their images are sharper and somehow look more solid than mine. By comparison, my image seems appears more jittery, whereas their image seems stable. (Think: a new VHS movie tape vs. a 5th generation copy)
As I mentioned, I do a lot composite editing. And, to tell the truth, I believe that if I stuck with simple "cuts" editing, my end product would look stronger. In essence, then, I believe it's the compositing that is "dirtying up" my image. Yet, watch almost any TV show (eg. Entertainment Tonight) and compositing is all you see!
So, that's why I'm wondering about where the weak link is in my workflow. Would I be better off to get a three-chip camcorder, thereby giving me a stronger image at the point of capture (i.e. one that would better hold up to the rigors of compositing)? Or, should I be thinking more about upgrading my editing codec, eg. from AIC to ProRes?
With reference to your comment that "transcoding won't add anything": From what I understand, AIC has less "color space" than, say, ProRes. Wouldn't having less color space yield a more "deteriorated" composited image? (Again, think of the VHS analogy: a 5th generation copy made with high-end VCRs would likely look better than a 5th generation copy made with consumer VCRs)
I hope my question is clear enough. :^)
I really do not understand all the technology involved. I just want my picture quality to be at least as good as my competitors'.
Again, Thank You, Peter. Any additional thoughts/information/advice you can provide would be greatly appreciated.
Vic


Return to posts index
Reply   Like  


John YoungRe: Can I get professional quality video (for broadcast) from a Canon T3i?
by on Oct 17, 2012 at 4:06:06 pm

I would bet the ACI codec is the culprit here. I haven't had first hand experience with ACI, but a quick look at info on the codec shows that it looks like a fairly lossy codec. I would guess that ProRes (for Mac) or DNxHD (for PC) would yeild much better results. And they are free, so that would be the first thing I would do before investing money into another solution.

A couple of points:
-You cannot technically get "broadcast quality" from any DSLR, Canon or otherwise. The BBC for instance, has a minimum of 50mpbs recording bit-rate for cameras used on their broadcasts. No current DSLR can do that (unless the camera is hacked).
-3 chip cameras, 7 years ago considered the best for video quality, have really fallen out of favor in a lot of people's minds. Three small (1/3" or 1/2") sensors still have that flat "video" look. Now people tend to go for one large sensor to get that more dynamic "film" look. And I would guess that is what your competitors are doing.
-The good news is that is what you have with your T3i, despite its limitations, it has a good large sensor. So you may be able to get what you want out of it. There are a lot of things that can go into getting "good quality" out of a DSLR. I would do some heavy research into lenses and ISO to see why you are not getting the "quality" you want out of your camera.

John


Return to posts index
Reply   Like  
+1

Brent DunnRe: Can I get professional quality video (for broadcast) from a Canon T3i?
by on Oct 17, 2012 at 4:15:58 pm

The 5D Mk II and Mk III have a full size sensor. The color can be pushed to a better dynamic range, giving you a better detailed image.
There is a significant difference between these two DSLR and the T1i, 60D or 7D.

You can upRes your edited content for a suitable codec that broadcast companies will accept.

Brent Dunn
Owner / Director / Editor
DunnRight Films
DunnRight Video.com
Video Marketing Toolbox.net

Sony EX-1,
Canon 5D Mark II
Canon 7D
Mac Pro Tower, Quad Core,
with Final Cut Studio

HP i7 Quad laptop
Adobe CS-5 Production Suite





Return to posts index
Reply   Like  
+1

Vic NoseworthyRe: Can I get professional quality video (for broadcast) from a Canon T3i?
by on Oct 17, 2012 at 7:12:31 pm

Hi John,
Thanks for your thoughts on this. You mentioned that ProRes and DNxHD are free? What do you mean? In order to utilize ProRes, I would have to invest in Final Cut Pro, wouldn't I? (Right now I am using FCE4, and that doesn't work with ProRes).
Thanks,
Vic


Return to posts index
Reply   Like  


Vic NoseworthyRe: Can I get professional quality video (for broadcast) from a Canon T3i?
by on Oct 17, 2012 at 7:13:00 pm

Hi John,
Thanks for your thoughts on this. You mentioned that ProRes and DNxHD are free? What do you mean? In order to utilize ProRes, I would have to invest in Final Cut Pro, wouldn't I? (Right now I am using FCE4, and that doesn't work with ProRes).
Thanks,
Vic


Return to posts index
Reply   Like  

Al BergsteinRe: Can I get professional quality video (for broadcast) from a Canon T3i?
by on Oct 17, 2012 at 4:14:08 pm

Vic, there are a lot of things going on with the notion of broadcast quality and also the issues you are seeing.

The quality between you and the 'pros' you talk about, could come down to stabilization, for example. Pros shooting weddings sometimes use gear to stabilize out their shots, and if you are shooting handheld, you are likely at a disadvantage.

Philip Bloom, Chase Garrett and Vincent Laforet are all top level shooters that primarily use HDSLRs and their work could easily be broadcast.

In my investigation into "broadcast quality" it's more the nature of broadcaster than the actual capability of the equipment. PBS, for example, wants you to shoot with a camera that will hold up under broadcasting (loosely defined), but the BBC has specific requirements that are overseen by engineers who put the cameras through rigorous tests for the codec to hold up. Minimum rates of throughput seem to be close to 50 Mbps as opposed to low end 24 runs of standard HDSLRs using something like AVCHD. Could your T3i shoot something that gets broadcast? Sure. Would they 'allow' you if you asked? Probably not. But I've heard that some broadcasters around the world are less picky.

Go look at the work of Bloom, Garrett and Laforet. It's about lighting, composition, tripod mounted and on the slider. Stable, high quality work. Great storytelling. Take your work to that level, and don't worry about broadcast quality. You'll get it by doing that. Some TV shooters have already done that, as documented here over the last few years with 5D shooters.

I for one, bought into the higher end cameras that are broadcast capable, because I am shooting right now a doc that I would like to see about getting broadcast, very unique Native American stuff, and I don't want it dismissed out of hand by PBS and others. But I love the look I get from my 7D. At times, it is the equal to my higher end cameras, and sometimes, not. If I ran it through an external capture device, it likely would be.

Al


Return to posts index
Reply   Like  

Peter BurgerRe: Can I get professional quality video (for broadcast) from a Canon T3i?
by on Oct 17, 2012 at 7:48:33 pm

John, Brent and Al gave excellent advice on "broadcast quality". I'd like to add just one tiny little thing: I really don't believe that - for video - there's such a huge differnce between the full frame cameras and the APC cameras concerning the picture quality. Of course there *is* a difference (DOF, low-light, quality...) but honestly, if you use your camera mainly for video, better invenst in gear, rather than a MkII or MkIII body... But that's just my personal opinion. As written, I edited a lot of DSLR videos from all sorts of DSLRs (exception: MkIII), the difference I noticed was mainly low-light.. But enough of that! Why don't you rent a MkII or MkIII and compare to your footage...

[Vic Noseworthy] " I believe it's the compositing that is "dirtying up" my image.

This might most definitly be the case. As written, the H.264 codec is a heavy compressing codec, so not much picture information left. Everything that cannot or just barely be seen in the original picture is thrown away by the codec (example: details in the shadows, ...) If you're doing intense post-production, colour-grading etc. those "weak spots" of the picture will get visible (excuse my english, I hope you get, what I mean).
Like a heavily compressed JPEG image: Do colour correction and artifacts will get visible.

The perfect solution for intense compositing of course would be to use not a DSLR but a camera with a better codec (especially codecs with 4:2:2 or even 4:4:4 colour subsapling and or 10bit) - or even a cam with a raw codec like the RED or Alexa. You'd have a lot more information left in the picture to play with. The problem is, these are mostly pro-cameras and they are ... well ... not very affordable.

[Vic Noseworthy] With reference to your comment that "transcoding won't add anything": From what I understand, AIC has less "color space" than, say, ProRes. Wouldn't having less color space yield a more "deteriorated" composited image? (Again, think of the VHS analogy: a 5th generation copy made with high-end VCRs would likely look better than a 5th generation copy made with consumer VCRs)
I hope my question is clear enough. :^)"

Sorry, I don't know too much about AIC, and I don't know if transcoding to AIC will degrade the footage, so all I can say here is: ProRes (even ProRes LT) or DNxHD or Cineform are (more or less) lossless codecs. That means you don't lose any picture information, but you won't add any information either. So you can't really compare to VHS copies.
Transcoding IMHO only makes sense now, if you can't work natively on your NLE.

------------------------------------------
"Tragedy is a close-up; comedy, a long shot." - Buster Keaton

Me on Twitter (english/german)
http://twitter.com/FastFoodVideo


Return to posts index
Reply   Like  
+1


Vic NoseworthyRe: Can I get professional quality video (for broadcast) from a Canon T3i?
by on Oct 17, 2012 at 8:06:46 pm

Thank you, again, Peter. If I could... just one more question:
Since I'm shooting in AVCHD, would I be better off using Premiere (which can natively edit that codec), or using Final Cut Pro (and ProRes)?
Two things to bear in mind:
I am talking about Premiere Pro CS4 (not CS5 or 6), since my current MacBook Pro can only run CS4.
Also, I can get Premiere Pro for around a quarter the cost of FCP7.
The latter point is not the biggest issue. Not that I have barrels of money; rather, that I want to invest in something that will solve my problem instead of just "making do".
Note: I've heard that, while Premiere Pro can, indeed, edit AVCHD, but that it can also introduce considerable stuttering unless one has a really powerful computer (I'm using a MacBook Pro 2.5 GHz Core 2 Duo).
Any thoughts?
Thanks so much,
Vic


Return to posts index
Reply   Like  

Peter BurgerRe: Can I get professional quality video (for broadcast) from a Canon T3i?
by on Oct 17, 2012 at 8:23:00 pm

[Vic Noseworthy] "Since I'm shooting in AVCHD, would I be better off using Premiere (which can natively edit that codec), or using Final Cut Pro (and ProRes)?" (...) "I've heard that, while Premiere Pro can, indeed, edit AVCHD, but that it can also introduce considerable stuttering unless one has a really powerful computer (I'm using a MacBook Pro 2.5 GHz Core 2 Duo).
Any thoughts?"


Don't think, I'm the right guy to answer that since im "Windows only" :) Had to edit on an iMac and FCP last week and it was a disaster. ;))

Sorry, can't really compare Premiere with FCP.

On Windows, CS4 wasn't too great for AVCHD if I remember correctly, haven't tried it more than once though.
I'm quite sure that native editing of DSLR footage wasn't really possible before CS5.

I absolutely don't know if this is even remotely comparable, but I had Windows 7 64Bit on an Intel Core2Quad running for about one year and was able to edit natively with Premiere CS5 with no big issues. But the moment I threw some effects on the clips, it took ages to render previews.

I did a hardware update recently (Intel Core-i5), so AVCHD is of no issue now.

But concerning Mac hardware, some expert should chime in here.

------------------------------------------
"Tragedy is a close-up; comedy, a long shot." - Buster Keaton

Me on Twitter (english/german)
http://twitter.com/FastFoodVideo


Return to posts index
Reply   Like  
+1

Tiago RibeiroRe: Can I get professional quality video (for broadcast) from a Canon T3i?
by on Oct 17, 2012 at 11:57:32 pm

Hi Vic,

Just want to add my cents as a pro-am that is always thinking budget versus quality.

I also love doing post. I don't shoot pictures in anything but RAW and I just love to get home and sit in front of Lightroom getting all my pictures perfect.

I also love to shoot video, but I find that same problem with H.264.

So I will leave you with two things to check out on yourself:

I use MagicLantern, with adds tons of features to your T3i, and although it is free, I contributed to them because it totally changed my T3i into a camera that is worth at least $1000 more. The guys that develop it totally deserve the money.
One of the features it has is the ability to change the compression ration on the codec, which can yield you a cleaner video (although you won't get rid of the 4:2:0). It also has other really cool features such as zebras, focus peaks and all sorts of things you expect to find in a pro video camera.
Remember to read the warnings - although I haven't ran into serious problems, it IS a kind of a custom firmware, and may in some situation cause damage to your camera.


Second thing is something I would love to use but haven't been able to afford:
The Ninja Atomos.
This is an external capture device that feeds on the HDMI port in the camera to save ProRes uncompressed 10bit video straight out.
I haven't tried it, so I can't tell you how great it works. It was recommended on a workshop I was in about Cinema with DSLR, and I've read all about in online.
But if you are a post/compositing guy and are willing to invest in that, than you should check it out.
Maybe you can rent it first and give it a try.
Personally, if I were making some money out of filming with my T3i I would definitely invest in it :)
You should, of course, make sure about the software that will be able to handle the ProRes codec, and also, if your computer will handle editing the uncompressed 10bit stream. It might become kind of RAM-edacious.


Return to posts index
Reply   Like  
+2


Peter BurgerRe: Can I get professional quality video (for broadcast) from a Canon T3i?
by on Oct 18, 2012 at 8:56:42 am

I can confirm Tiagos advice concerning Magic Lantern. Higher bitrate will give you more room in post. You'd also could try one of the various flat styles like the Technicolor Cinestyle.
There is a lot of information about that in the COWs "DSLR Video" subforum.

[Tiago Ribeiro] "This is an external capture device that feeds on the HDMI port in the camera to save ProRes uncompressed 10bit video straight out.
I haven't tried it, so I can't tell you how great it works. It was recommended on a workshop I was in about Cinema with DSLR, and I've read all about in online."


Not sure either if it'll work, because AFAIK the only Canon DSLR that provides FullHD HDMI-out is the 7D, but even on the 7D it is not a clean-feed. All(?) other Canon DSLRs only output 480p (SD) video via the HDMI-port...

------------------------------------------
"Tragedy is a close-up; comedy, a long shot." - Buster Keaton

Me on Twitter (english/german)
http://twitter.com/FastFoodVideo


Return to posts index
Reply   Like  

Tiago RibeiroRe: Can I get professional quality video (for broadcast) from a Canon T3i?
by on Oct 18, 2012 at 12:26:21 pm

You are correct, HDMI will not provide FullHD, but it might be close enough so that you will be willing to lose a bit of screen resolution in turn of bit depth:
http://magiclantern.wikia.com/wiki/HDMI_Output
Here you have the info.
So you can get 1620x1080 with 3:2 pixel ration out of HDMI.
Fair enough as a cheap way to get uncompressed 10 bit :)
There are also some demo videos.
Remember that the problem of the demo videos is that when they show you the uncompressed output from hdmi you still see some compression due to the online streaming codecs.
Anyway, you can see that it is cleaner. I'm just not really sure how clean it really is when you capture it.


Return to posts index
Reply   Like  
+1

Peter BurgerRe: Can I get professional quality video (for broadcast) from a Canon T3i?
by on Oct 18, 2012 at 10:36:40 pm

[Tiago Ribeiro] "So you can get 1620x1080 with 3:2 pixel ration out of HDMI.
Fair enough as a cheap way to get uncompressed 10 bit :)"


Thanks, Tiago! I wasn't aware of that! Much appreciated!

------------------------------------------
"Tragedy is a close-up; comedy, a long shot." - Buster Keaton

Me on Twitter (english/german)
http://twitter.com/FastFoodVideo


Return to posts index
Reply   Like  


Danny PilpeRe: Can I get professional quality video (for broadcast) from a Canon T3i?
by on Feb 28, 2014 at 7:21:11 am

Vic,

I am Daniel and I hope i can help clarify a few of your questions. Lets simplify it all to say that having a DSLR is a good thing but your camera is as good as your lens. I know that the last person said the same thing, but it is true, to be able to produce the best possible footage you need good glass. I have worked with both Pro cam, as well as DSLR cameras. I have 3 main lenses that I can recommend, i use a kit canon lens that came with a 5D Mark ii it is an Lseries lens ( they are much more expensive but worth every dime), I also use a 50mm Nikon lens it is a 1.7 and finally i use a canon wide 28mm lens with a 2.0. The three lenses have a great look to them and are incredibly diverse. If you are using good glass then you need to look at your ISO along with your aperture and shutter speed ( unfortunately it is too much to explain in this post, but I recommend reading up on that relationship) That will determine your depth of field, your speed and your light (remember a DSLR works more like a film camera than a camcorder). another thing to look at is your white balance, always check your white balance. The other thing that you should be aware of is the format in which you are recording your video. See in DSLRs and T3i specially you must tell your camera how to record, 1080p 720p? also if you want a more cinematic look i would recommend shooting on 24p (that is progressive footage oppose to interlaced) it is very nice, but i personally tent to shoot in 30p because of the movement. Finally, don't despair it takes some time to get used to DSLRs but once you do, you will love them, trust me.
Good Luck,


Return to posts index
Reply   Like  

Vic NoseworthyRe: Can I get professional quality video (for broadcast) from a Canon T3i?
by on Feb 28, 2014 at 3:06:31 pm

Hey, Daniel.
Thanks for your input. Since my original post, I have been reading and experimenting. I do now realize that capturing a quality image requires solid knowledge of all aspects of traditional photography (i.e. aperture, ISO, etc.). I am shooting with a 50mm 1.4, so I figure that has not been my problem. Personally, I think my dissatisfaction does stem from an expectation that the camera will do more than it actually does, in terms of giving the proper exposure, etc. Your point about this is well taken. I think I've come to understand that, while it is possible to get great images with the T3i, it's vital to get it right from the start, as there is so little latitude in post. I think that could be my problem. Also, I have been shooting in the factory settings, and now realize I should be shooting not in 'Standard' setting, but rather in 'Neutral'.
Also, I've read that most (or at least many) lenses have 'best' apertures (typically in the middle of the range of apertures, I believe). I expect my video quality to improve in the coming months.
Another problem that I believe is huge: I shoot wedding videos, and the delivery format is typically DVD. I absolutely hate that final stage of compressing for DVD! I find the biggest drop in picture quality happens there. I wish brides/couples wanted another format instead of DVD.
Finally, I would mention that, to improve the quality of the video captured on my Vixia camcorders (which I absolutely love, by the way) I recently purchased an external monitor. It has zebras, false color, and a couple of other features that should be a big help (not to mention the larger screen).
So, all in all, I'm getting there. Having said all of this, I suspect one other issue is me! I am (like most in this business, perhaps) a bit of a perfectionist. I knit-pick my work, while "laypersons" (i.e. family & friends) say, "Go on, b'y, you're nuts! It looks great!" But, I know it could be better. (And, I expect it will be!)
Oh, and, I just thought of one other comment you made: your point about color balance. That, I know, is critical as well (and not always easy to get right, especially in a run and gun situation like weddings!). For broadcast work, and in a studio setting, I'm sure much attention must be paid to this aspect.
All in all, though, as I said, I believe I am getting there. I just get a little frustrated, because my favourite part of the process is post-production. I really enjoy putting the whole story together.
If only I was using better codecs! Perhaps with my next camera purchase...
Thanks, again, Daniel.
Vic


Return to posts index
Reply   Like  

shur harewoodRe: Can I get professional quality video (for broadcast) from a Canon T3i?
by on Oct 22, 2012 at 6:47:12 am

The Canon Cameras are used in broadcast see http://blogs.aljazeera.com/blog/asia/shooting-news-dslr

But bear in mind you may need to uprez you codec as certain requirement want a recording of file of 50MBbs and 422 colour space.

DSLR fails this so a conversion is needed, DSLR is great for web delivery see many showreels here and projects well, it maybe worth checking with your broadcaster or commissioning company to see what the final delivery or recommended camera/footage specs they require.

Shoot, Edit and Enjoy

United By Photography


Return to posts index
Reply   Like  
+1


Nea GoguRe: Can I get professional quality video (for broadcast) from a Canon T3i?
by on Jun 1, 2013 at 7:01:40 pm

Just some things i want to add. DSLR cameras are used for broadcast. But you need to keep in mind that this is mainly a commercial product and it's basically a tradeoff between price and features. It's not exactly designed for studio use (though some actually use it for this).
About the datarate... please check the video datarate. It's in the range of 48Mbps. So actually very close to 50Mbps.
Getting back to the image that is not so vivid....

Well, what's your equipment? If you expect to get professional image using the camera as it comes from the box, well... it's not going to work. The kit lens is actually there just for a quick start. It's not really a lens, it's just designed to show the features of the camera and to show the image stabilization feature that actually works superb (considering that it's a cheap kit lens). Unfortunately the image the kit lens produce is barely usable for anything serious. T3i + kit lens is more or less equivalent with a point and shoot camera. You will get very nice images but you need good lens for that. Yes, it's somewhat weird to pay $500 for the camera and another $1500 for the lens. But there are some low cost lens that would produce very good images. I would mention here the Canon 40mm F2.8 (pancake) and the Canon 50mm F1.4. The later is actually sharper than a lot of expensive L lenses. The kit lens is more or less safe to throw away ( provided that that's not your one and only lens).
Also, you need filters. Don't bother with UV filters. You need a polarization filter. This will reduce unwanted reflections and will produce more saturated colors. Also, in bright light you need an ND filter. Do not close the aperture !!! Especially not above F8-F11 !!
Why? Because at low apertures you will get a huge amount of refraction that will destroy your image. Just keep the aperture under F8 and you'll get the best images. If you have too much light, just add an ND filter. You will get best images at large apertures like F2.8 and below. The kit lens only goes to F3.5 and only at the wide end.
Experiment some more and compare the results. You can also rent some lens if you think it might help you.
The T3i is actually a very nice camera. It's much better than a camcorder. With good lens you can get better results than many more expensive camcorders. Remember that you have a recorder with interchangeable lens. Something that in the past used to cost $10.000+


Return to posts index
Reply   Like  
+1

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
Share on Facebook


FORUMSTUTORIALSFEATURESVIDEOSPODCASTSEVENTSSERVICESNEWSLETTERNEWSBLOGS

Creative COW LinkedIn Group Creative COW Facebook Page Creative COW on Twitter
© 2014 CreativeCOW.net All rights are reserved. - Privacy Policy

[Top]