Creative COW SIGN IN :: SPONSORS :: ADVERTISING :: ABOUT US :: CONTACT US :: FAQ
Creative COW's LinkedIn GroupCreative COW's Facebook PageCreative COW on TwitterCreative COW's Google+ PageCreative COW on YouTube
ADOBE PREMIERE PRO:HomeTutorialsForumArticlesPodcastsBasics ForumCreative Cloud Debate

Is it best to use higher qaulity DNxHD formats on lower spec computers?

COW Forums : Adobe Premiere Pro

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
Share on Facebook
Ben EdwardsIs it best to use higher qaulity DNxHD formats on lower spec computers?
by on Aug 12, 2012 at 1:12:35 pm

It has just occurred to me it may be better to use the DNxHD 145 rather than the DNxHD 36 Avid format for lower spec machines (as long as your HDs are reasonably quick).

My logic is that the greater the compression the harder the CPU has to work for playback, and even DNxHD 145 (which is good for DSLR footage) is only 18 MB/s.

Is my logic correct or does the Avid format not use higher CPU for playing more compressed formats (or are they the same or do the more compressed formats require less CPU for playback).

--
Ben Edwards - Freelance Picture Editor
http://www.funkytwig.com

i5 550, Windows 7 / Mac Lion, Nvida 550 Ti, 8GB Mem


Return to posts index
Reply   Like  

Gary HuffRe: Is it best to use higher qaulity DNxHD formats on lower spec computers?
by on Aug 12, 2012 at 1:30:31 pm

That's an interesting question, Ben. I too have been looking to improve my Premiere CS6 editing experience. I can make Premiere CS6 (OSX version) unusable by adding a CPU-intensive filter (i.e. Colorista II), and while I understand that I can't expect real-time playback with certain filters, nothing else on the timeline will play without lagging heavily, and the interface (i.e. moving elements on the timeline, selecting media, ect.) also begins to lag. Turning off the effect or removing it altogether does not make the situation any better. The only solution is to close and re-open Premiere, at which time performance is back like I expected (this is Lion 10.7.4 with MacBook Pro 17" Early 2011 model, 16GB of RAM, 512 Crucial M4 SSD, and a striped G-RAID Mini through eSATA).

I'm wondering if it has to do with AVCHD/H.264 files as that's what I primarily edit, and I know there are still some issues with working with those files natively. That also goes double for me I think because I shoot a lot on a hacked GH2, which produces AVCHD files that are not to spec (i.e. 75Mbps+ bit rates). However, I'm getting these issues with normal AVCHD files as well as H.264 video from a Canon DSLR.

I have done lots of transcoding via 5DtoRGB for a past client where I had to use FCP7, and I'm wondering if that's a good idea to go back to for now as Adobe continues to improve AVCHD/H264 handling (and hardware continues to get faster).


Return to posts index
Reply   Like  

Ben EdwardsRe: Is it best to use higher qaulity DNxHD formats on lower spec computers?
by on Aug 12, 2012 at 1:51:18 pm

Probably not useful for you but I gave up on Mac and switched to Windows (on same box) and everything worked (after installing latest Nvida drivers and windows service pack 1). This may well be sorted by Adobe in future updates and my box is not massively powerful (i5 3550).

In some ways my posting is a little lazy as I could give it a try (and am going to in a bit) but wanted to find out others experience.

I was also told by Adobe that DNxHD is a 32 codec, the Abode guy said he likes XDCAM.

with DSLR native footage Adobe dose some cleaver stuff so the fact that it is 8 bit does not cause a problem 9I think it up-samples to 10 bits when doing effects etc). I was wondering if Premiere does this for other formats.

--
Ben Edwards - Freelance Picture Editor
http://www.funkytwig.com

i5 550, Windows 7 / Mac Lion, Nvida 550 Ti, 8GB Mem


Return to posts index
Reply   Like  


Gary HuffRe: Is it best to use higher qaulity DNxHD formats on lower spec computers?
by on Aug 12, 2012 at 2:40:28 pm

[Ben Edwards] "Probably not useful for you but I gave up on Mac and switched to Windows (on same box) and everything worked (after installing latest Nvida drivers and windows service pack 1)."

I have a Windows desktop (sadly only Core 2 Quad at the moment though). And it generally works smoother, but I have a project on it that is a mixture of DVCPRO HD and hacked GH2 footage and I get weird playback lags with that (one sequence plays back a frame every 10 seconds for some reason, even though I haven't had any issues with the rest of the sequences that feature that same footage mix). My desktop has an internal workdrive featuring a single Western Digital Black 1.5TB (7,200 RPM 64MB Cache) and I've considered moving that to a striped RAID with either a second identical drive or going hog wild and getting two Velociraptor drives, but I'd hate to do that and see no benefit.

[Ben Edwards] "I was also told by Adobe that DNxHD is a 32 codec, the Abode guy said he likes XDCAM."

Yes, that's interesting too, and not a terribly bad idea, but I prefer the way 5DtoRGB processes the footage and my only options out of that are DNxHD/ProRes. I guess if you wanted to go to XDCam for editing, that would require running everything through Media Encoder first.


Return to posts index
Reply   Like  

Ben EdwardsRe: Is it best to use higher qaulity DNxHD formats on lower spec computers?
by on Aug 12, 2012 at 6:28:51 pm

OK, had a quick look at 5DtoRGB and cant work out how it is different to mPEG Streamclip apart from its rather dubious claim to 'extracts every last drop of video quality from cameras'. How is it better than MPEG Streamclip, I assume it has the same parelel processing option (On my box doing 4 at once speeds whole thing up.

It also only seems to encode to Quicktime wrapped (32 bit in PP codecs). Would it not be better to go to XDCAM, although I guess you would have to use AME for that (haven't looked for parallel options in it yet.

--
Ben Edwards - Freelance Picture Editor
http://www.funkytwig.com

i5 550, Windows 7 / Mac Lion, Nvida 550 Ti, 8GB Mem


Return to posts index
Reply   Like  

Gary HuffRe: Is it best to use higher qaulity DNxHD formats on lower spec computers?
by on Aug 12, 2012 at 10:47:56 pm

[Ben Edwards] "OK, had a quick look at 5DtoRGB and cant work out how it is different to mPEG Streamclip apart from its rather dubious claim to 'extracts every last drop of video quality from cameras'. How is it better than MPEG Streamclip, I assume it has the same parelel processing option (On my box doing 4 at once speeds whole thing up."

From what I can gather it corrects the luminance range shift bug that exists in Quicktime, fixing the gamma issues.


Return to posts index
Reply   Like  


Dennis RadekeRe: Is it best to use higher qaulity DNxHD formats on lower spec computers?
by on Aug 12, 2012 at 10:41:04 pm

[Ben Edwards] "I was also told by Adobe that DNxHD is a 32 codec, the Abode guy said he likes XDCAM."

I might be the Adobe guy and for clarity sake, I'm speaking of DNxHD in a QT wrapper is a 32-bit process. Currently, Premiere Pro does not natively support Avid MXF files (DNxHD in an MXF wrapper).

Dennis


Return to posts index
Reply   Like  

Ben EdwardsRe: Is it best to use higher qaulity DNxHD formats on lower spec computers?
by on Aug 13, 2012 at 12:52:03 am

[Dennis] I might be the Adobe guy and for clarity sake, I'm speaking of DNxHD in a QT wrapper is a 32-bit process. Currently, Premiere Pro does not natively support Avid MXF files (DNxHD in an MXF wrapper).

Indeed it was;). I afraid that confused me rather than cleared things up;). Are you saying DNxHD is supported with MOV but not with MXF?

Also as I have you here is the 'upscaleing' that is done with native DSLR to allow it to be handled as 10 bit (I think that is what I read) done with other 8 bit formats.

--
Ben Edwards - Freelance Picture Editor
http://www.funkytwig.com

i5 550, Windows 7 / Mac Lion, Nvida 550 Ti, 8GB Mem


Return to posts index
Reply   Like  

Dennis RadekeRe: Is it best to use higher qaulity DNxHD formats on lower spec computers?
by on Aug 13, 2012 at 10:50:31 am

As Avid's DNxHD codec is proprietary it cannot be read by programs in it's native MXF format unless the software has a license to decode/encode it. CS6 does not have a license to DNxHD so it must go through QT in order to read it with the Avid LE codecs pack which is free.

Hope this helps,
Dennis


Return to posts index
Reply   Like  

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
Share on Facebook


FORUMSTUTORIALSFEATURESVIDEOSPODCASTSEVENTSSERVICESNEWSLETTERNEWSBLOGS

Creative COW LinkedIn Group Creative COW Facebook Page Creative COW on Twitter
© 2014 CreativeCOW.net All rights are reserved. - Privacy Policy

[Top]