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Overcoming the clip length limitation

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Dan AsselinOvercoming the clip length limitation
by on Sep 30, 2010 at 12:34:31 pm

I would like to buy a T2i to use as part of a mobile interview kit. It is perfect because I will also need to shoot some quality stills while I am onsite. However my interview lengths are likely to run beyond the 10 or 15 minute mark which would cause me a problem with overheating. My question is if I took the HDMI (or composite) output from the camera and did my recording on a laptop would I be able to record as long as I want without worrying about overheating? In other words is overheating only an issue when recording to an internal card?

Thanks

Dan


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Jared NelsonRe: Overcoming the clip length limitation
by on Sep 30, 2010 at 2:30:22 pm

I own a 5D, and on my camera you can set the "auto power off" to the off setting. So in theory you could do what you have said... some of the problems outputting over composite is you would be recording in SD. The HDMI signal is in HD although it might be 1080i. Also it will not be a clean video signal. My camera will display all of the user info like record light, meter box, etc. Not sure if there is a way to turn that off. As for overheating, I would say there would be no issue. In fact I have not once had over heating issues on my 5D. I know other people who have had issue... but I just finished a 2 week show, 3 camera shoot, with no overheating. Probably depends on your situation... maybe i'm just lucky. But letting the computer capture the images as apposed to the camera is definitely going to keep your camera cooler.



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Steve CrowRe: Overcoming the clip length limitation
by on Sep 30, 2010 at 3:07:43 pm

I should say I really don't know the answer to your questions for sure but my suspicion would be that you would still have the 12 minute limitation and that the heat issue would still exist as long as the camera is turned on.

I don't even know if not having a card can still work if you are going out the HDMI port. Also, I don't believe you would be getting HD out of the HDMI but rather standard definition...check with others with that but that's my understanding.

All the best...I have the T2i and use it for interviews it's a simple matter to turn the camera on and off while I am asking questions (since I don't want my voice anyways) - also I would never use a clip of someone talking more than 3 minutes at a time - that's an eternity for the type of business documentaries I produce.

Steve


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Darrell BeckRe: Overcoming the clip length limitation
by on Sep 30, 2010 at 3:22:18 pm

I shot about 40 interviews over the summer with the T2i. Most were 10 to 15 minutees in length. I NEVER, EVER had an overheat problem. As my interview would start approaching the 10 minute mark, I would simply stop recording for a few seconds and start again, creating a new file.

Writing to a card does not the heat, it is keeping the image sensor fired up (and draining a battery, which warms up).

The HDMI output is not 1080. I think it is just 480, so I do not think that would be an option.


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Caspian BrandRe: Overcoming the clip length limitation
by on Sep 30, 2010 at 3:53:50 pm

There was a new product announced at IBC earlier this month that's supposed to let you tap the Live View functions of the camera over HDMI to a monitor/recorder that brings in the signal as PRORES. My understanding of the record length limit of video on the DSLRs was that it is due to a File System limitation of the memory cards formatting, which cannot handle files larger than 4GB, but I could be mistaken.

http://www.atomos.com

It's not shipping yet, but looks promising. I've heard on the 5D and 7D if you hit "info" three times it takes all the overlays off the Live View so a clean signal is sent out over HDMI. Not sure if similar functions are available on the T2i, but it's worth looking into once this thing is shipping, supposedly in December.

-Caspian

Product Specialist
Studio Network Solutions


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James WagonerRe: Overcoming the clip length limitation
by on Sep 30, 2010 at 3:33:45 pm

To give you the answer you are looking for is in a nutshell, no. When you plug in the HDMI cable to a tv or capture card, the resolution will cut to 1440x900. Even then the onscreen info shows up as well.

The 7D however, having 2 sensors, will show full 1080p on screen when not recording to the memory card. You will still see the crop box unless you cycle through the display options to turn it off.

There is a collection of videos on vimeo from a wedding videographer that just switched to 7Ds and T2is for his cameras. In that collection he demoed the HMDI capabilities and compared the T2i and 7D. http://vimeo.com/channels/jjdslr. Lot of good info.


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Dan AsselinRe: Overcoming the clip length limitation
by on Sep 30, 2010 at 5:29:36 pm

Fantastic Guys. Thanks for everything. Like most things about DSLR Videography any question seems to bring out a lot more questions. If I find some definitive info based on your input I will be sure to post it immediately.

Thanks Again.........Dan


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Theo DubeuxRe: Overcoming the clip length limitation
by on Sep 30, 2010 at 6:09:58 pm

Ok, we're talking about 2 different things: the overheating is due to the sensor being exposed, so it can capture the image. It doesn't matter where you record it, be the card or via the hdmi - the sensor will get hot, there's no turnaround, BUT... id doesn't get hot so fast. As Darrell said above, you can shoot for hours, turning it off frequently, with no problem.
The other thing is the 12 minutes limit, for recording on card. The simplest way to avoid it, is to stop recording, for just a second, say before 10 minutes, maybe when asking a question.


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John FreyRe: Overcoming the clip length limitation
by on Sep 30, 2010 at 7:58:55 pm

The Panasonic GH2, that was just released last week and is replacing the GH1, has none of the overheating or limited video record durations that you will find in the T2i. I often use 2 of the GH1 units in place of our regular HD cameras. They can produce a very fine picture at 1080 24p, and the GH2 now has realtime HDMI out in full resolution while recording. The 14-140mm kit lens is pretty nice, and you can adapt just about any lens as well. We recently purchased 2 used Nikon Nikkor 50mm 1.4 lenses with adapters for $200.00. They are great for interviews. The GH2 will be available in October.

John D. Frey
25 Year owner/operator of two California-based production studios.

Digital West Video Productions of San Luis Obispo and Inland Images of Lake Elsinore


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Dan AsselinRe: Overcoming the clip length limitation
by on Sep 30, 2010 at 8:14:05 pm

Thanks John that seems like a great idea


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Michael SacciRe: Overcoming the clip length limitation
by on Oct 1, 2010 at 1:10:50 am

The HDMI is completely clean if you press the display button a couple of times but is 1080i 50i (on EU model, 60i on US model) until you hit record, then it goes to 1080p 24p but with a record symbol and a timer. (From Phil Bloom's blog)

Definitely a step in the right direction, but I don't know why these camera companies will not listen to what most of us want. (But Panasonic at least seems to be trying.)


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Peter DeCrescenzoRe: Overcoming the clip length limitation
by on Oct 1, 2010 at 1:45:21 am

Here's the link to Philip Bloom blog post that Michael Sacci mentions:
http://philipbloom.net/2010/09/30/my-first-look-at-the-gh2-clean-hdmi-out/

Stay tuned for further info, but so far, so good!

See also:
http://forums.creativecow.net/readpost/280/3150

---

http://www.peterdv.com


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Dan AsselinRe: Overcoming the clip length limitation
by on Oct 1, 2010 at 3:57:57 am

Thanks. I sometimes think the camera manufacturers have an interest in depression drugs the way they tease us.


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Steve YuRe: Overcoming the clip length limitation
by on Oct 1, 2010 at 3:58:28 pm

There are pros and cons to all of these DSLRs. They all have capabilities to produce incredible picture quality.

If clip length is a primary concern, you definitely should be looking at a GH1 or GH2. It is a non-issue. I have been shooting documentary footage for a year and some interviews are around an hour in length. I haven't hit a max clip length yet.

The GH2 is ideal but if you're on a T2i budget you might consider the GH1 (find a used hackable version if you can, as the newer ones prevent the bitrate hack from being used). I didn't like taking stills with my GH1 and the 14-140mm kit lens but I absolutely love taking stills with the 20mm f/1.7 lens.


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joe beckerRe: Overcoming the clip length limitation
by on Feb 26, 2012 at 4:23:25 pm

to answer your question, YES, the overheating problem is limited to the internal card. if you use software like Adobe's OnLocation, you can record directly to a hard drive. I do this for live events. the camera is on a tripod. I put a table with a laptop next to the tripod and connect via firewire. I click the record button in the software on the screen. the hard drive has a much larger capacity than my SD card. I can shoot an entire event. We do a TV talk show and concerts that way. it would work for any live event where you have your cameras on a tripod

Joe Becker
jbeckercreative


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John FreyRe: Overcoming the clip length limitation
by on Feb 26, 2012 at 5:43:26 pm

I am assuming that you are referring to a regular standard definition camcorder that has a Firewire connection. No DSLR that I know of has Firewire. I used On Location that way for years, and have even monitored the composite output of my HD cameras, both camcorders and DSLR's, via On Location.

John D. Frey
25 Year owner/operator of two California-based production studios.

Digital West Video Productions of San Luis Obispo and Inland Images of Lake Elsinore


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joe beckerRe: Overcoming the clip length limitation
by on Feb 26, 2012 at 9:19:28 pm

first, I mentioned that I do NOT own a DSLR. there is no reason in hell to use a standard def cam. since I don't own a DSLR, I do not know what type of connectors they use. but, two of the people I shoot live events with use DSLRs and OnLocation. I never asked them how they connect their computers. I use firewire

Joe Becker
jbeckercreative


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