Creative COW SIGN IN :: SPONSORS :: ADVERTISING :: ABOUT US :: CONTACT US :: FAQ
Creative COW's LinkedIn GroupCreative COW's Facebook PageCreative COW on TwitterCreative COW's Google+ PageCreative COW on YouTube
SONY VEGAS:Sony Vegas TutorialsSony Vegas ForumArticlesBasics ForumBlack Magic Design ForumAJA Xena Forum

Small Form Factor Editing Machine

COW Forums : Sony Vegas

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
Share on Facebook
Matt SmitherzSmall Form Factor Editing Machine
by on Feb 13, 2011 at 7:33:10 am

I am having this SFF editing machine assembled for Vegas pro 10 64.

Dimensions are mandatory, don't want to have mid tower or desktop hanging around, all other solutions-small case with standard sized motherboards are not than much different (in terms of overall dimensions)

Not willing to go to the Laptop way, My compromise has been inspired by this article:
http://www.techreaction.net/2010/08/13/gaming-in-tight-spaces-mini-itx-feat...


The spec I ordered are the following:
Case: Silverstone SG-05 450W
Cpu:i7 870
MB: Gigabyte H55N (mini itx)
Ram 8 gb (4x2 Kingston Khx 1600, the maximum supported)
OS(Win 7-64) HD: Intel SSD 8o GB (X25 MG 2)
Data HD: 1,5 TB Hitachi 7K3000
Video Card: Asus GTX460

This case accept a slim DVD drive (which I already Own, external).

Any recommendations/improvement suggestions?
Or major flaws I did not considered?
I should be still in time to alter something.
My concerns could be mainly the data HD.
Power should be enough....
I know is only SATA 3gb/s....

Thanks


Return to posts index
Reply   Like  

Nigel O'NeillRe: Small Form Factor Editing Machine
by on Feb 13, 2011 at 11:19:05 am

Matt

80 GB for a C: drive might be a bit on the low side. Your programs will fill them quickly, especially with temporary/render files which are not always easy to track down. Generally, you should keep your drive below 80% capacity. Most hard drives get inefficient as they get full.

The only consideration of a small form factor is heat gets concentrated in a smaller case, and these i7's pump out a lot of heat under load. It can stress some components to the point of failure. As I live in Eastern Australia, it can get to mid 30 degrees centigrade. My editing suite once got to about 40C (104F) when someone accidentally closed the door in the middle of a big render.

I run 5 HDD's and 3 burners to save all the mucking around. In your case, you might want to consider getting an e-SATA drive caddy if you have not already, and swap drives in and out. USB 3.0 drives are still quite rare in Australia, so HDD's are the cheapest option for me.

Given that Vegas takes advantage of NVIDIA video cards, have you considered the GTX470 or even the GTX580?

Intel i7 920, 12GB RAM, ASUS P6T, Vegas Pro 10 (x32/x64), Windows 7 x64 Ultimate, Vegas Production Assistant 1.0, VASST Ultimate S Pro 4.1, Neat Video Pro 2.6


Return to posts index
Reply   Like  

Matt SmitherzRe: Small Form Factor Editing Machine
by on Feb 13, 2011 at 11:51:33 am

[Nigel O'Neill] "80 GB for a C: drive might be a bit on the low side. Your programs will fill them quickly, especially with temporary/render files which are not always easy to track down. Generally, you should keep your drive below 80% ca"
Software shouldn't fill that much, and was planning to have temporary files on the data HD (1,5TB).

I already have a nice 1,5 raid 1 / 1,5 Tb external, eSata & usb2 (not the full connection fwire version)
http://www.stardom.com.tw/sohotank_st2_feature.html

ABout the 470& 48O Nvidia, read posts and tests here on forum, and look like Cuda improvements are not that much there.

About the Heat dissipation, this case looks like the best dissipating one as SFF (in relative terms...).

I was in WA last week, can understand what you talk 'bout.

Thanks


Return to posts index
Reply   Like  


Jeff SchroederRe: Small Form Factor Editing Machine
by on Feb 13, 2011 at 2:40:31 pm

Matt,

When I built my work machine I put a 60 GB as the C drive. The "users" file structure has been redirected to another drive and I have optimized my Windows 7 install for an SSD. I currently have 60-65% capacity on my SSD and have had no problems with it. (1 year of use). So smaller drives will work, you must set up your system correctly.

Jeff

http://www.narrowroadmedia.com


Return to posts index
Reply   Like  

Scott FrancisRe: Small Form Factor Editing Machine
by on Feb 13, 2011 at 2:48:50 pm

I run a 60GB SSD main drive as well and put other files elsewhere, no problem here so far. If you have esata, I would recommend using it as a "render too" drive, I keep all my source files on one drive and do renders to another and have seen better speed that way, also if you can afford it a Contour Design Shuttle Pro is a REALLY nice extra controller. I got one for Christmas and love it! Under $100 USD!

Scott Francis
Mind's Eye Audio/Video Productions


Return to posts index
Reply   Like  

Matt SmitherzRe: Small Form Factor Editing Machine
by on Feb 13, 2011 at 3:20:19 pm

[Scott Francis] "I run a 60GB SSD main drive as well and put other files elsewhere, no problem here so far. If you have esata, I would recommend using it as a "render too" drive, I keep all my source files on one drive and do renders to another and have seen better speed tha"

Thanks.
and Yes, the Gigabyte H55N has 1x eSata out,
http://www.gigabyte.com/products/product-page.aspx?pid=3455#sp
which I can connect to the Stardom dual bay raid 1 (eSata & Usb2 too).
Have also a small nice 2.5'' HD usb2 eSata small drive (which need to be powered though).

Actually the HD would be (if I have understood yr suggestions)
C: drive 80 GB SSD (internal) ->OS
E: drive 1,5 tb 3.5'' (internal) ->Render files
G: External Bay drive(s): 1,5 eSata (raid1) ->Source files

For the Shuttle Pro I got it covered some years ago (the first Shuttle pro), bought a (partially) Hercules' rebranded one, bundled with a not-so-good PCI firwire card (Via chipset if I remember well)
http://www.extremetech.com/article2/0,1697,1148643,00.asp
There was not the Adorage titler though.


Return to posts index
Reply   Like  


Scott FrancisRe: Small Form Factor Editing Machine
by on Feb 13, 2011 at 3:41:58 pm

I would use the external sata (esata) as render TO, on-board esata is not as fast as internal (which I just recently found out the hard way with a GRaid)so I use my esata as render to since it is not accessing my source files and speed is not as important. If you are using a PCIe esata card, speeds my be the same or better for esata, then either way is fine. I use a Blackmagic intensity pro card and use their software to test the throughput of my hard drives. If you are using uncompressed files (HD) than speed is very important for your source files.... Good luck!!

Scott Francis
Mind's Eye Audio/Video Productions


Return to posts index
Reply   Like  

Matt SmitherzRe: Small Form Factor Editing Machine
by on Feb 13, 2011 at 4:04:14 pm

I do not exactly understand....
the INTERNAL drive (1 x1,5 TB) will be connected to one of the ''Four SATA-300 ports controlled by the MB chipset''.

eSata shouldbe ExternalSata (isn't just the connection difference? is the eSata protocol different from the -internal-SATA??

The eSata is not out of a PCI card (this is a Mini-Itx card, has just 1 PCI slot for the videocard).
The eSata controller is straight out of the motherborad, or better ''One eSATA-300 port controlled by the MB chipset''.

And the external stardom HD (2 x1,5TB raid 1=1,5Tb total) has an hardware raid controller hooked to its own eSata card....


Return to posts index
Reply   Like  

Scott FrancisRe: Small Form Factor Editing Machine
by on Feb 13, 2011 at 4:12:40 pm

One would wish that were always the case. If you can check you MB specs, a lot of time they put the esata later in the hierarchy, around where the USB controllers and such are. That is my experience. So NO it is not just a connection difference. I HAVE run eata off of an internal sata port and just purchased a sata to esata adapter that sits on the back of the case as if it where a slot. Then the speeds would be the same (theoretically, it also depends on your esata case and HD). As I said before I found all this out recently when I purchased a GRAID and used my onboard esata port, speeds were slower than internal so I went with an internal raid.
You would be wise to check the flow chart for data flow in you MB manual and see where the esata ports sit....you may have the same issue I did, or perhaps not. I am using a high end Gigabyte MB (next to the highest for AMD (I have a Phenom II X6). In any case I would at least check it out....have fun!!

Regards

Scott Francis
Mind's Eye Audio/Video Productions


Return to posts index
Reply   Like  


Matt SmitherzRe: Small Form Factor Editing Machine
by on Feb 13, 2011 at 4:21:26 pm

Ok, understood.

You imply that probably the sata controller is prioritizing over the eSata (depending clearly on how the md circuit are designed).

Will check and try too hook the eSata external box through an adapter to an internal Sata connector...will check it out

Thanks.


Return to posts index
Reply   Like  

Scott FrancisRe: Small Form Factor Editing Machine
by on Feb 13, 2011 at 6:13:55 pm

Check you MB specs first...perhaps it is the same as sata, I would just research before you assume...I learned the OPPOSITE way...unfortunately!!

Take Care!

Scott Francis
Mind's Eye Audio/Video Productions


Return to posts index
Reply   Like  

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
Share on Facebook


FORUMSTUTORIALSFEATURESVIDEOSPODCASTSEVENTSSERVICESNEWSLETTERNEWSBLOGS

Creative COW LinkedIn Group Creative COW Facebook Page Creative COW on Twitter
© 2014 CreativeCOW.net All rights are reserved. - Privacy Policy

[Top]