Creative COW SIGN IN :: SPONSORS :: ADVERTISING :: ABOUT US :: CONTACT US :: FAQ
Creative COW's LinkedIn GroupCreative COW's Facebook PageCreative COW on TwitterCreative COW's Google+ PageCreative COW on YouTube
SONY VEGAS:Sony Vegas TutorialsSony Vegas ForumArticlesBasics ForumBlack Magic Design ForumAJA Xena Forum

Rendering and saving video for the long term

COW Forums : Sony Vegas basics

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
Share on Facebook
Jason SorbyRendering and saving video for the long term
by on Aug 17, 2012 at 2:11:55 pm

I've got two years worth of video folders piling up that I have finally decided to edit. I just purchased Sony Movie Studio 12.

The majority of my videos were taken with my Panasonic HDC-TM700 which creates its video files with the following characteristics :

Type of file : AVCHD Video (.m2ts)
1920x1080
Data Rate : 24438 kbps
Total Bit Rate : 24694 kbps
Frame Rate : 59 frames/second

I'd like to edit and burn most of my videos to BluRay and have managed to create my first DVD with success. But I am a little unsure of what to render these movies to for long term storage on my hard drive. I have been told by others that you should just buy a large external hard drive and keep all your files in raw original format. I understand that but... I really feel that once I edit these files into various projects, all I am going to want are the final rendered files to view and possibly re-burn in the future. It’s very unlikely I’ll look back on the old raw footage but will want to view my finalized projects and don’t want to rely on having Movie Studio version 13 or 14 in the coming years.

What’s the highest possible quality I can render and save to? What I’ve learned so far is :

1. I know I can create .ISO file images of the BluRay project for re-burning later but I don’t think you can open and view those when sitting at your computer, right?

2. It looks like the best option is “Blu-Ray 1920x1080-24p, 16 Mbps video stream” but I have been told that 16Mbps is quite low and I should be targeting something at 32 Mbps or higher? I don’t see that as an option anywhere Movie Studio.

3. Aren’t my original files 24 Mbps anyways?

4. I’ve read John Rofrano’s comments about rendering video and audio separately because of “DVD compliant streams” and I think I understand that.

Thanks for reading my wall of text. I appreciate all input!


Return to posts index
Reply   Like  

John RofranoRe: Rendering and saving video for the long term
by on Aug 19, 2012 at 1:12:24 am

[Jason Sorby] "1. I know I can create .ISO file images of the BluRay project for re-burning later but I don’t think you can open and view those when sitting at your computer, right? "
Sure you can. Install Virtual Clone Drive and just double-click on the ISO file and it will mount and you can get at all of the files.
[Jason Sorby] "2. It looks like the best option is “Blu-Ray 1920x1080-24p, 16 Mbps video stream” but I have been told that 16Mbps is quite low and I should be targeting something at 32 Mbps or higher? I don’t see that as an option anywhere Movie Studio."
If you only want the final video in high quality, you could render the project to XDCAM EX using the HQ 1920x1080-60i, 35Mbps VBR template. That should preserve your 24Mbps video quite nicely. What you will loose is the 60fps frame rate that you shot it with.

To keep that frame rate you can render to Sony AVC using the AVCHD 1920x0180-60i template and change the Frame rate to 59.940 (Double NTSC). The only drawback is that this codec maxes out at about 18Mbps.
[Jason Sorby] "3. Aren’t my original files 24 Mbps anyways? "
Yes they are. That's why people suggest that you archive the original footage because it doesn't get any better than that!
[Jason Sorby] "4. I’ve read John Rofrano’s comments about rendering video and audio separately because of “DVD compliant streams” and I think I understand that. "
Yes, but for archive you want the video and audio together in one file.

~jr

http://www.johnrofrano.com
http://www.vasst.com



Return to posts index
Reply   Like  

Jason SorbyRe: Rendering and saving video for the long term
by on Aug 19, 2012 at 8:15:48 pm

In both suggestions, you advised that I go with 60i options. I am pretty sure that my original footage is non-interlaced, progressive scan. Doesn't 60i imply interlaced?


Return to posts index
Reply   Like  


Jason SorbyRe: Rendering and saving video for the long term
by on Aug 19, 2012 at 8:37:18 pm

I was just able to go in and customize an AVC template. I've adjusted it to :

Video Format : AVCHD
Frame Size : High definition (1920x1080)
Frame Rate : 59.940 (Double NTSC)
Bit Rate (bps) : 25,999,360

What do you think of this? I haven't tried rendering anything yet...


Return to posts index
Reply   Like  

Jason SorbyRe: Rendering and saving video for the long term
by on Aug 20, 2012 at 1:44:11 am

I tried it and it dropped my bit rate to 16 Mbps when rendered. So what's preferable? 30 fps + 24 Mbps or 60 fps + 16 Mbps ?


Return to posts index
Reply   Like  

John RofranoRe: Rendering and saving video for the long term
by on Aug 23, 2012 at 6:36:58 pm

[Jason Sorby] "In both suggestions, you advised that I go with 60i options. I am pretty sure that my original footage is non-interlaced, progressive scan. Doesn't 60i imply interlaced?"
Yes, that's because Blu-ray does not support 60p or 30p so 24p is your only choice for delivering progressive footage and rendering your 60p down to 24p would be a crime. That's why I suggest you use 60i. It doesn't matter that it's interlaced because your original footage was progressive so each field will contain the same information. It should look like 30p even though it's not.

~jr

http://www.johnrofrano.com
http://www.vasst.com



Return to posts index
Reply   Like  

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
Share on Facebook


FORUMSTUTORIALSFEATURESVIDEOSPODCASTSEVENTSSERVICESNEWSLETTERNEWSBLOGS

Creative COW LinkedIn Group Creative COW Facebook Page Creative COW on Twitter
© 2014 CreativeCOW.net All rights are reserved. - Privacy Policy

[Top]