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Tutorial: Working in 3D Part 4: Finessing Camera Animation

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Andrew DevisTutorial: Working in 3D Part 4: Finessing Camera Animation
by on Mar 9, 2012 at 6:35:23 pm


Adobe After Effects
Working in 3D Part 4: Finessing Camera AnimationWorking in 3D Part 4: Finessing Camera Animation

In this final tutorial in a set of four on working in 3D space in After Effects, Andrew Devis builds on the quick and simple camera animation technique demonstrated in the previous tutorial by showing how to finesse your camera animation with various techniques so that you can end up with a professional result very quickly and with very little effort.

Tutorial, Video Tutorial   03/09/2012
Author: Andrew Devis



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+6

Rob MizeRe: Working in 3D Part 4: Finessing Camera Animation
by on Mar 12, 2012 at 8:56:46 pm

Andrew... Congratulations on a wonderful series of tutorials. I am in awe of your prolific output, and your presentation is top-notch... well paced and easy to follow.

I can't believe I've never used the Look at All Layers.
As always, I'm looking forward to your next tut.

Many thanks...

Rob Mize


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Andrew Devis@Rob Mize
by on Mar 13, 2012 at 2:30:21 pm

Hi Rob

I've probably told you this before, but it means a lot when I get some positive feedback from yourself - thank you :o)
Andrew

... because it's all about stories ...


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Steven PritchardRe: Working in 3D Part 4: Finessing Camera Animation
by on Mar 12, 2012 at 10:20:43 pm

Andrew, a terrific series of tutorials. I struggle with 3D and camera animation and this has helped incredibly.

Thanks
Steve


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Andrew Devis@Steven Pritchard
by on Mar 13, 2012 at 2:33:15 pm

Hi Steve

I'm really pleased you've found these tutorials helpful as they are aimed at getting people happy to work with 3D. I have also done a further follow-on tutorial which will be coming out in the next few days which shows how to use target layers to pan large images or compositions to get more accurate camera placement. It uses the same technique but I hope you will find that helpful as well.

Thanks for your comments.
Andrew

... because it's all about stories ...


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Ruby HuynhRe: Working in 3D Part 4: Finessing Camera Animation
by on Mar 16, 2012 at 8:41:05 am

Thanks so much Anrew, that's what I was trying to find before. Thanks for sending this tutorial.


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Andrew Devis@Ruby Huynh
by on Mar 16, 2012 at 4:49:35 pm

Hi Ruby

Really pleased these have helped. There is another tutorial due to come on-line soon which follows this series to show how to pan around large scenes/layers/compositions in a similar way. Keep an eye out for that.

Thanks for the comment
Andrew

... because it's all about stories ...


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+1

Matt Heward-MillsRe: Working in 3D Part 4: Finessing Camera Animation
by on Mar 19, 2012 at 11:13:17 pm

Andrew

Wonderful tutorials, really grateful for these. Well explained and a joy to follow. These have literally saved me days of time and frustration trying to figure out.

thanks very much.

Matt


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Andrew Devis@Matt Heward-Mills
by on Mar 20, 2012 at 8:33:28 am

Hi Matt

I agree, it can take a long time to get to grips with AE 3D if you don't have someone to teach you. It actually took me quite a while to understand it all myself so it's great to be able to save others the time and confussion that you can go through trying to get to grips with it all.

You have probably seen it, but do also check out the "Panning large scenes" tutorial as well as it gives a nice little tip on how to pan large comps or images so you can focus on just the bit you want to see.

All the best with your animation and thanks for stopping to make a comment.

Andrew

... because it's all about stories ...


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David PattersonRe: Working in 3D Part 4: Finessing Camera Animation
by on Apr 30, 2012 at 9:08:19 pm

Hi Rob
As a hobbyist I've sometimes found animating the camera within layers somewhat intimidating; invariably spending a lot of time without really achieving my objective. Your tutorials have therefore been a boon to me. Thanks a bundle for your efforts.
Dave

Genius creates what it must; talent creates what it can.


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Andrew Devis@David Patterson
by on May 1, 2012 at 9:36:10 am

Hi Dave

I'm really pleased you've found the series helpful. I must confess that I too started off feeling very intimidated by the whole 3D aspect of AE so it is a real pleasure to be able to share what I've learnt to help others.

Thanks for your kind words.
Andrew

... because it's all about stories ...


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Dejan NaumovskiRe: Working in 3D Part 4: Finessing Camera Animation
by on May 30, 2012 at 5:31:56 pm

Thank you Andrew! When I'm finished watching any of your tutorials I feel like I know stuff :D. But then again, when I start watching the next one I feel like "wait! nooo way :D" so I'm learning more and more each day thanks to you.


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Andrew Devis@Dejan Naumovski
by on May 30, 2012 at 9:19:09 pm

Thanks Dejan, I really appreciate the feedback. Keep learning and keep enjoying learning :o)

Andrew

... because it's all about stories ...


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Ian HagertyRe: Working in 3D Part 4: Finessing Camera Animation
by on Oct 31, 2012 at 3:17:59 am

Well done!!!!!!!!!! Thanks for getting me excited about using after effects cs6!!!!! Making a video for my school (I am the video editor)... I switched from Final Cut Pro to the new Premium Pro Suite. I have so much to learn!


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Andrew Devis@Ian Hagerty
by on Oct 31, 2012 at 9:21:52 am

Hi Ian

It's great to hear that you are all fired up for your switch to Production Premium and I know that given time you will really learn to enjoy using both Premiere Pro and After Effects as they are very powerful and work so well together.

All the best with the video - any questions, feel free to ask.
Andrew

... because it's all about stories ...


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Ian Hagerty@Andrew Devi
by on Oct 31, 2012 at 11:09:48 am

You are a video 'yoda' who actually gets back (even more impressive)! Okay, I do have a question and one which really throws me off regarding after effects. With Final Cut Pro or Premiere the timeline 'layer' remains fixed on the timeline (snaps). In after effects, I can move layers to the far left if I wish starting at 0:00.00. I don't get that at all??? Why are we able to move the layers to the left past our line of vision regarding the time line? If I involuntarily move it, it will throw my video edits off somewhat. Therefore, is there a way to lock it??? Thanks again... Ian


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Andrew Devis@Ian Hagerty
by on Oct 31, 2012 at 2:32:45 pm

Hi Ian

Good question and I think (if I understand it correctly) you kind of answered the question yourself.

You can move layers in AE to change animation timings. If I move it left or right I change the timing of the animation to match some other aspect of my creation - which can be a very helpful feature!!

However, I know it can also be a real pain if you accidental move a layer, but there is a little lock button at the start of the layer next to the eyeball and solo buttons. If you have a layer in the right place you can do one of two things. You can either lock it so it can't be selected and moved. Or, you can shy the layer so that once again it can't be accidental selected and moved but will still be available if you un-shy the layers.

Hope this helps
Andrew

... because it's all about stories ...


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Ian Hagerty@Andrew Devi
by on Oct 31, 2012 at 9:50:28 pm

Thanks a lot Andrew! I get it. After Effects is an incredible program that I am trying to wrap my thought process around. I loved that tutorial about 3D particles..WOW! 3D is my new dimensional world to play in making videos. I have bookmarked all your tutorials and I'll be watching each and everyone of them to take it to another level. I specialize in music videos for my students by the way. If I stumble upon another question, I hope you don't mind my throwing it your way. Thanks for the quick replies and your help.. Ian


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Ian Hagerty@Andrew Devi
by on Nov 1, 2012 at 2:12:26 am

Andrew, I am back with another question (they will eventually stop, promise!). I have a new DSLR HD video camera and a SD pro camera. I have video in both HD and SD. This is my issue: Should I create a music video staring with a HD compostion/sequence settings and then export as SD for DVDs for my students OR should I start with a SD composition and go from there. Again, thanks...


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Andrew Devis@Ian Hagerty
by on Nov 1, 2012 at 10:11:59 am

Hi Ian

No problem with the questions :)

Difficult to answer in some respects but I think you need to have the final output in mind when you choose which settings to use.

If most of your footage is from the HD camera then that is the obvious choise simply because you can scale things down and keep quailty but you can't scale things up and keep quality without a plug-in!

However, if SD is you output anyway and most of your footage is from the SD camera then go with an SD setting and scale the HD footage down as you bring it into the comp.

For me, I always go for HD because scaling up is a no-no and you never know when you will be asked to go back to a project and produce a bigger version for YouTube or whatever.

If this is the case, have a look at this http://www.borisfx.com/units/upRez.php it is an upRez plug-in from BorisFX. Redgiantsoftware.com also do one but their website is presently off line due to the storm Sandy! If you do consider this, also have a look at potential filters to go with it such as this http://www.borisfx.com/units/image-restoration.php or the equivalent from Red Giant.

For a project I did a while ago I used the Red Giant Plug-in and a really nice filter called Neat Video (I did a tutorial on it on Creative Cow). The combination was really good.

What you are doing isn't scalling the SD footage but actually adding pixels in to make SD HD. And, if you have lots of SD footage that you are going to want to use in HD comps and sequences then this is a really great choise. I believe that both the BorisFX.com and Redgiantsoftware.com plug-ins work with BOTH PP and AE - which is really nice!

So, I think the short answer is start with HD unless you absolutely know you will only ever need an SD output.

Hope this helps and all the best with the music vidoes.
Andrew

... because it's all about stories ...


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Ian Hagerty@Andrew Devi
by on Nov 1, 2012 at 11:23:07 am

Thanks for your input Andrew! I think I will start my next video in HD, but the compromise is that in SD with HD footage you can get a great ZOOM and not lose resolution, right? If I start with HD, I won't be able to achieve the same 'zoom' effect without compromising pixelation in the shot, right? I think I know what I'm trying to explain to you (ha ha). So if I got this right in my head, the HD footage is obviously better quality and would fill out the entire screen. The SD footage would arbitrarily center up in this HD comp and be 720 by 480. If I scale it up, the vid will lose quality but by adding those Boris plug'ins, I'd be able to scale them up. Is that right? I will watch that tutorial you mentioned. Thanks master 'yoda'... you do a great job !!!!!!!!!


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Andrew Devis@Ian Hagerty
by on Nov 1, 2012 at 2:25:41 pm

Hi Ian

Yes, you are correct, if you start with an HD comp then you won't be able to zoom. The most you should really scale an HD piece of footage is to 110% after that is starts to soften far too much.

Incidently, you can still get that effect with pictures if their size is greater than HD - which is often the case - just not with the HD footage.

And, if you start with an HD comp and drop SD footage into it it will come in small. However, if you are clever about it you can use the SD footage for 'picture-in-picture' effects. Otherwise, you need to 'up-rez' the footage (not up-scale) with a plug-in to get it to full HD size. This will also probably 'up-rez' the noise, thus the additional filter I mentioned to get rid of extra noise.

May the force be with you! :o)
A

... because it's all about stories ...


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Ian Hagerty@Andrew Devi
by on Nov 2, 2012 at 12:09:46 am

kind of ironic to get a better zoom with sd vs hd in a sd comp... I have used picture in picture effects in the past (it can be amazing as well). Andrew, what is your opinion on the following: I am about to make a video using a song by u2. Using the audio .WAV track, would using Premiere Pro be more effective than After Effects? I ask that question because I can't get the audio track to play in After Effects as it does in Premiere Pro. I have to do a ram playback preview in After Effects, right? I am aware of Premiere Pro and editing in After Effects via dynamic link. Should I just stick with After Effects and edit the entire music video there? Again, thanks for the responses (much appreciated). Han Solo


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Andrew Devis@Ian Hagerty
by on Nov 2, 2012 at 9:31:50 am

Young Padawan, I can see the force is strong ... but you have much to learn ... etc etc

Was that a song by U2 or R2D2? ...

Enough already! You are correct that you will not hear audio except with a RAM preview or a shift+RAM preview in AE - except that the . key on the num pad will play the audio ONLY - i.e. you won't see any animation.

As for dynamic link, there is a new AE basics tutorial due out any moment now that deals with that exact issue - getting AE comps quickly in PP.

For me, I would maybe make PP my main editor and do everything I can in there, and then I would create AE comps for the bits that PP can't do and use dynamic link to get those comps into PP.

PP is you editor first and foremost which means it is the one to cut and shuffle, review and play with, while AE is your complex asset creation device where you do that extra complex flying text or add those special FX.

While you could do the whole thing in AE, it will probably be easier to do it in PP ...

HOWEVER, do remember that you can set everything up in PP including your music to get timings etc and then dynamically link that sequence into AE if you wish to work that way.

I think the key is to remember that whatever you dynamically link will play back in a more jumpy way - so if you set up the basics in PP so you know the timings are all correct it may work better to then more into AE where you really need to see the more complex bits smoothly and you can turn the PP sequence on and off as needed.

So, the answer to your question is YES, NO, Maybe ....

This probably doesn't help so ...

May the force guide you
A

... because it's all about stories ...


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Ian Hagerty@Andrew Devi
by on Nov 2, 2012 at 10:31:42 am

I try and use jedi mind-tricks on my students, but the mind tricks never seem to work....lol. I love the idea of switching between PP and AF via dynamic link. As for the U2 or R2D2, I chose to use "Magnificent" by U2. The opening of the tune is my gateway into the 3D world using cameras and lights. I have a few old stills that I will create into layers and then get that 3D still image effect going using the camera option in AF. I'm still learning the inS and outs of using these features but man oh man am I motivated to do so. Quick question: If I have a 30 second video clip in HD, can I extract the individual frames and create individual still images using either Photoshop, After Effects or Premiere Pro? I want to create an image sequence effect of sorts. So, can 30 seconds of video become 30 stills exported to a folder? Thanks Yoda... the force is strong with you!


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Andrew Devis@Ian Hagerty
by on Nov 2, 2012 at 10:45:59 am

Use the force!! - which in Première Pro = CNT + Shift + E or the small camera icon below the the program or source monitors! This will export a still image in a format of your choice from whatever video you are using.

Alternatively in PP use Time > Posterize Time effect to change the frame rate of a piece of footage to give a more stuttery image sequence type of look by turning down the frame rate to say 10 or 12 frames per second - or even less if it works.

Trust your senses young padawan
A

... because it's all about stories ...


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Ian Hagerty@Andrew Devi
by on Nov 2, 2012 at 9:58:25 pm

Are these shortcuts for a MAC? Master Yoda, I am going to attempt to use 3D text with a group photo of 150 students. I hope it does not cause a ripple effect in the universe as we know it...enough of that.. haha... I have a group photo of 150 of my students and I want to put this image in the text 2008-2013 and have that image fill the text and go from right to left on the screen in a 10 second span. Okay, so here is my question oh short one (yoda). Would you recommend doing my comp via Photoshop and then import into AE or work directly from After Effects. I hope my endless questions are not wearing you down! Jaba


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Andrew Devis@Ian Hagerty
by on Nov 3, 2012 at 4:59:20 pm

Young Padawan, do not deviate from the path you have started down - you will find the power if you look hard enough!

AE is the answer - create the text and make it 3d. Put the picture layer below the text layer and then choose TrkMat (if you don't see this toggle buttons or press F4) and choose 'Alpha Matte' for the text layer and the picture will fill the text. If it comes in the wrong way round with the text cut out from the picture then select the other Alpha inverted option.

Now create your camera (ctr + alt + shift + c), select the camera layer, hit C to get the camera tools - and then follow the tutorials about working in 3D that I did for creative cow to animate the camera.

You can also animate the picture inside the text to show different parts of the picture if you like.

If you aren't moving the text and picture in 3d and just animating the camera, then you should move the picture in the X and Y only. Z will zoom the picture in and out of the text.

So, use the force and do not deviate to other lesser places!

Yoda

... because it's all about stories ...


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Ian Hagerty@Andrew Devi
by on Nov 3, 2012 at 7:32:06 pm

Master Yoda,
I am having a blast manipulating photos and then using the 3D camera effect in AF. It is totally AWESOME!!!!! As for the recommendations you proposed to me above, I will try them out and look forward to making the text look awesome. I want to get a bevel (protrusion) effect going with the text so it enters from the right and exits on the left of the screen. There are so many amazing tools in AE. I am fooling around with lights and cameras. Why didn't I train to become a jedi years ago? I was a Final Cut Pro user and am no longer part of the 'dark' side....haha. You are doing a great job!!!! Thanks again....... Chewy


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Ian Hagerty@Andrew Devi
by on Dec 9, 2012 at 6:51:59 pm

I will attempt making my 3D text layer Master Yoda!!!! I will do it today. My "Magnificent" video is coming along nicely. I am slowly but surely getting used to AE, PS and PP. My students are going to love this video. Thanks for all the tips... very much appreciated!!!!!!!!!


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Andrew Devis@Ian Hagerty
by on Dec 12, 2012 at 4:28:28 pm

Chewy!! Great to hear that the end is nigh ... I think ... lol In fact, after your last post about the macbook I was wondering if you were being tempted by the dark side ... after all they have just released the latest iMacs ...

Really pleased the project is moving ahead so well, if you can, why not send me a link to the finished item?

a Hut!

... because it's all about stories ...


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Ian Hagerty@Andrew Devi
by on Dec 13, 2012 at 12:55:21 am

Hey Andrew, I can send you a few links as I have made over 100 videos over the years (the progression from a young WOOKIE to a want-a-bee Master jedi has been a process). Now that I have decided to fully embrace PP, AE and PS, the challenge is steep but AWESOME!!!! I am currently working on the title (2008-2013) and trying to layer the title over an image thus filling the layer with the photo. I recently watched your tutorial on the Shatter method and I believe I will use that method in overlaying the text on an image. Guess what? I just purchased Red Giant's "Effects Suite 11". What do you think of that? May the force be with you Master Yoda... keep the force going!!!!!!!!!!! All the young jedis out there like me are learning tons because of you ... thanks!!!!!!!!!


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Andrew Devis@Ian Hagerty
by on Dec 13, 2012 at 7:17:46 am

Excellent! I was re-tweeting the Red Giant sale hoping people would see what great value it was - and for one day a year only! However, you may find it makes your machine feel a little ... slow when you start to use some of those very powerful effects!

Have a good one
A

... because it's all about stories ...


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Ian Hagerty@Andrew Devi
by on Dec 13, 2012 at 11:50:44 am

I know. I was playing around with those effects and yes, the computer takes a hit render wise which leads me to this question:
While working in AE, if you have a few layers plus effects added and other render intensive additions, would you recommend exporting the layers with effects, etc., back INTO the AE project as a lossless file so as to make the machine work more efficiently? That is my question Master Yoda? Is that the best approach to make the process faster? Thanks again and may the force be with u2!


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-1

Andrew Devis@Ian Hagerty
by on Dec 17, 2012 at 11:04:47 am

Sorry for slow reply, I was away and my phone only wanted to type backwards! In answer to your question, I have an AE basics tut coming out soon on this, but what you want to do is use the 'Prerender...' facility in AE.

Pre-compose the layers that are slowing your machine down, open up that comp and go to Composition>Pre-render which adds the comp to the render que. However, the action is render and replace at the end which will replace the comp in other comps with whatever you have rendered it to.

If you just want a proxy then render it to a low quality format, but if you think it's finished render it out to a high quality format such as an image squence.

Hope this helps
Andrew

... because it's all about stories ...


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Ian Hagerty@Andrew Devi
by on Dec 17, 2012 at 11:42:11 am

Master Yoda,
Thanks for the answer. I don't fully understand it (I kind of do though)so that tutorial will be welcomed news on 'AE basics tut. It kind of leads me to another question. Okay, so you have a layer and precompose it such as an image layer. Should you apply effects to the original layer (photo) or the precomposition? Second question: should I worry about de-interlacing my footage or does AE take care of that automatically for me? Thanks for your patience and as always, awesome answers. The force is strong with you!!!!!! Chewy


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Andrew Devis@Ian Hagerty
by on Dec 17, 2012 at 12:55:12 pm

Hmmm ... thinking deeply about the way of the force you are ...

You can apply affects to either, so the question you need to ask yourself is, 'will I need to replace this image/footage/text at some point down the road and still need to have these effects applied?'

If you need to be able to replace the item, then pre-compose it and apply the fx to the pre-comp (kind of like putting the asset in a clear envelope and applying the effect to the envelope so you can switch out the contents of the envelope any time and still have the effects looking exactly the same).

But, if you don't need to switch it out then just apply it to the layer.

However, if you want to use a layer with effects later in your project to drive anyother layer (like using a layer as a texture layer for the shatter effect) then you need to pre-comp the layer AFTER the effect has been applied so that the effect will see it as a complete layer. This is because effects usually ignor any effects you may have put on a layer unless it is pre-composed.

As for de-interlacing, I will be honest with you - I'm not sure! This is because if I am worried about it I actually use a BorisFX effect called deinterlace which de-interlaces the footage in the comp ...

Usually it isn't an issue and you never need to worry about it for normal projects as the output will be whatever you want - ie H.264 progressive even though the source footage is interlaced. But, I have found that there are times when the comb effect can be quite noticable with fast moving footage, so under those circumstances I de-interlace in the comp for better results.

But, if you questions is about final output, don't worry about it, AE will do the work for you.

Pre-render ... sorry not to be very clear :o( basically, it does what you were asking and the 'Post Render Action' for the Output Module you select is set to 'Import & Replace Usage' as the default option.

So, having selected the effects heavy and slow layers and pre-composed them. You open that pre-comp and then select Composition>Pre-render... and just make sure that the output module has the format of your choice selected and it is outputting to a place you want it to go to. Then render it out.

The issue you have is about quality - if you are going to make changes later in the project then choose a low quality file format to render out quickly on the basis that you will render it out all again in the future at a higher quality. In which case, change that Post Render Action to 'Set Proxy' and use this low quality version in your project until you're ready to export the final version.

However, if you are finished with that part of your project then leave it as Import & Replace Footage and choose a lostless file format like an image sequence and then the whole thing will start to place back at a sensible speed thereafter.

PS - make sure you save the image sequence is a folder of its own

...... hope this helps

... because it's all about stories ...


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Ian Hagerty@Andrew Devi
by on Dec 18, 2012 at 3:36:48 am

You are quite the Master VideoYoda!!!!!!! Your long explanation is very much appreciated. I get the envelope analogy. I also understand what you wrote about the layer + add effect then precompose to make SHATTER work. The interlacing part is still a mystery to me but I'll take your word that AE will make the right moves for me. I am still a bit 'lost-less' haha about the whole issue of rendering out to speed up the process, so I'll wait for that tut of yours that will be coming out. I just need to experiment with what you wrote above. I recently purchased BEAT ASSISTANT to detect the beats in a .WAV file and it is quite amazing. I am also discovering EXPRESSIONS (e.g., WIGGLE) and how they can be used in timeremapping to give some incredible results. AE is AmAzING! This 41 year old students wishes he had discovered this program light years agoooooooo! Thanks... I will post a link to my videos soon!!!!


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