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overexposed area in video

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paolo zunigaoverexposed area in video
by on Aug 17, 2012 at 5:26:58 pm

Hi, I recently shot a video using multiple cameras at different angles. Unfortunately one of the cameras was not angled correctly and part of the frame is completely overexposed. Is there a way I can correct this in After Effects or Final Cut?

Below is an capture of the overexposed area (left part of the frame).


thanks


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Tudor "Ted" JelescuRe: overexposed area in video
by on Aug 17, 2012 at 5:38:55 pm

If you tell us what format is the footage you shot this in, maybe we can provide a solution. It makes a world of difference if you have highly compressed footage or raw video.

Tudor "Ted" Jelescu
Senior VFX Artist


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paolo zunigaRe: overexposed area in video
by on Aug 17, 2012 at 5:49:32 pm

ok. Shot with a t2i > 1920x1080 > raw file

that help?


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Tudor "Ted" JelescuRe: overexposed area in video
by on Aug 17, 2012 at 6:04:42 pm

As far as I know, there's no way of shooting full HD video on a Canon 550D/T2i in RAW format- it's compressed H264 in a .mov container.That means your color information is compressed.
Try to uncompress the footage and then you can play with masks and color correction to get back as much detail as possible and to bring down the whites.

Tudor "Ted" Jelescu
Senior VFX Artist


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paolo zunigaRe: overexposed area in video
by on Aug 17, 2012 at 6:24:05 pm

ok. can you suggest any links or provide some info on how to "uncompress" h264 .mov files so that I can adjust such details?

thanks


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keith mcgregorRe: overexposed area in video
by on Aug 17, 2012 at 6:59:20 pm

Sorry to say but that looks like all the info is gone. With digital, and especially with hdslr footage you really need to light carefully, as with digital when you over-expose it's lost and gone, not like film where it can retain the information with it's wider latitude. You can try to bring it down but I assume you have already tried that in fcp with the 3way cc and you saw it turn grey and flat and no definition on the door. You should get the cine-look plugin and shoot flat (web search for your camera), then you can retain a higher degree of latitude. As far as uncompressing, I would also like to know how this is possible when the footage is already at h264 and didn't get the information in the first place. As far as I know there is no way; if it wasn't there, you can't add it. Say, as in if you shoot 4:2:0, transcoding to 4:2:2 or HQ or 4:4:4 will do nothing for your colorspace.
Sorry, no good news from me.
-Keith


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Tudor "Ted" JelescuRe: overexposed area in video
by on Aug 17, 2012 at 7:05:21 pm

In this situation un-compressing will not bring the info back, but what will do is make AE happy and allow it to deal with each frame in an uncompressed clip instead of having to deal with partial information.

Tudor "Ted" Jelescu
Senior VFX Artist


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Tudor "Ted" JelescuRe: overexposed area in video
by on Aug 17, 2012 at 7:02:21 pm

You would use Adobe Media Encoder to transcode the file to a uncompressed Animation (.mov QuickTime) or any other uncompressed format. Expect very large files.

Tudor "Ted" Jelescu
Senior VFX Artist


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Barend OnneweerRe: overexposed area in video
by on Aug 19, 2012 at 2:53:29 pm

Although After Effects is faster when working from uncompressed material (given a fast working disk, otherwise it might even slow down due to the filesize of the uncompressed material) - the picture quality is the same, whether you work directly from the h264 or convert to uncompressed first. Working directly from h264 means you save the disk space but AE may be a bit slower because it needs to decompress the stream and convert to RGB before the other operations.

And back to the original problem: looks to me like the image is completely blown out to max white there. Nothing simple you can do about it now. In theory you could try to replace the blown out material with a still image that you track into the frame.

Barend

Raamw3rk - independent colourist and visual effects artist


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paolo zunigaRe: overexposed area in video
by on Aug 20, 2012 at 6:42:20 pm

Thanks for the input! Obviously nothing like taking the time to do it right while shooting. It was a fast production with a fast turnaround so it seems like there isn't much that can be done without diving into some serious post work. But I think I'll be looking into this whole uncompressed file thing. I'm new to this and wasn't aware of compressions and shooting flat, etc..

thanks again!


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