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Need to record video to Digital recorder

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Greg BallNeed to record video to Digital recorder
by on Jul 12, 2012 at 8:47:08 pm

I have a client looking to have us shoot presentation on stage, and at the same time record their powerpoint slides with the audio from the presenter as reference, so they can edit in the correct slides later. They's like to record on a Firewire Digital recorder of some type to avoid spending time digitizing the footage later on. This is a 5 day conference. Any thoughts would be very helpful.

Thanks


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Mark SuszkoRe: Need to record video to Digital recorder
by on Jul 12, 2012 at 9:48:26 pm

Could they just turn on a screen recorder app on the laptop or tower that's serving the powerpoint? That would record to a file, the screens as well as any ambient audio the mic picks up. There are freeware screen recorders out there if you look, or you could use a common one like Camtasia.


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Greg BallRe: Need to record video to Digital recorder
by on Jul 12, 2012 at 11:01:37 pm

Hi Mark,

Thanks for the advice, but they specifically requested that we record the PPT screen and audio feed for the full conference. I typically do that with a Mini DV camera , but they want a digital file, shot in SD



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Mark SuszkoRe: Need to record video to Digital recorder
by on Jul 13, 2012 at 4:17:52 am

What I would do if this were my gig, and the budget was low, is hook a scan converter to the output of the laptop, and feed that iso powerpoint video to a DVD recorder. Mixed audio from the podium would also feed to that master iso recording. DVD is SD and digital. You can record up to 8 hours on one DVD but the quality is sketchy at 8 hours so I'd set the record bitrate to the 2-hour setting to maintain better quality. It is no huge deal to find a minute every two hours to swap in a new blank DVD, then finalize them afterwards. A fast import method for post is to use the free MPEG STREAMCLIP program to convert the DVD to your format of choice, much faster than realtime.

Still, if the point is just to have a synchronized source for adding the power points back in post, there are better ways of going about the process, namely, live-switching on location, with an iso backup. Then you just have a tiny post session for minor cleanup, if anything at all. If you just can't swing the budget for a live switch, you *could* do one other thing...

Powerpoint has rehearsal modes and audio recording modes, as I recall. Set it to record the audio to itself, while the actual slide show is going on, and now your graphics will retain higher quality, since they won't be going thru multiple D/A and A/D conversion steps.


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Mark SuszkoRe: Need to record video to Digital recorder
by on Jul 13, 2012 at 4:38:49 am

from google:


You can either record a narration before you run a slide show or record a narration during a slide show and include audience comments in the recording. If you don't want narration throughout the presentation, you can record comments only on selected slides or turn off the narration so that it plays only when you want it to play.

When you add a narration to a slide, a sound icon appears on the slide. As with any sound, you can either click the icon to play the sound or set the sound to play automatically.

To record and hear a narration, your computer must be equipped with a sound card, microphone, and speakers.

Before you start recording, PowerPoint 2010 will prompt you to record either just the slide timings, just the narrations, or both at the same time. You can also set the slide timings manually. Slide timings are especially useful if you want the presentation to run automatically with your narration. Recording slide timings will also record the times of animation steps and the use of any triggers on your slide. You can turn the timings off when you don't want the presentation to use them.

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Record a narration before or during a slide show
When you record a narration, you run through the presentation and record each slide. You can pause and resume recording any time.
Ensure your microphone is set up and in working order prior to recording your slide show.
On the Slide Show tab, in the Set Up group, click Record Slide Show .
Select one of the following:
Start Recording from Beginning
Start Recording from Current Slide
In the Record Slide Show dialog box, select the Narrations and laser pointer check box, and if appropriate, select or deselect the Slide and animation timings check box.
Click Start Recording.
TIP To pause the narration, in the Recording shortcut menu, click Pause. And to resume your narration, click Resume Recording.

To end your slide show recording, right click the slide, and then click End Show.
The recorded slide show timings are automatically saved and the slide show appears in Slide Sorter view with timings beneath each slide.



Afterwards, powerpoint can export the slides (in high visual quality) and audio to an AVI file or whatever. This method leverages what's already on hand requiring no new gear except maybe plenty of empty hard drive space on the laptop. Might want to experiment to see if this will work for you.


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Greg BallRe: Need to record video to Digital recorder
by on Jul 13, 2012 at 3:25:51 pm

HI Mark,
As always thanks for all of the advice. I think we're getting further away from what the client wants.

The just want to have a reference file that they can refer to of the actual screen with PPT on it. Typically a presenter for this conference will use a laser pointer to point to specific parts of the screen.

To do this we typically use a DVcam and record the screen with an unmanned camera. This client wants this capability, but doesn't want to be stuck with 30 hours of footage to digitize. He's asking for some kind of camera that can record via firewire to some kind of digital video recorder. Thoughts?



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Martin CurtisRe: Need to record video to Digital recorder
by on Aug 16, 2012 at 12:05:55 am

[Mark Suszko] "What I would do if this were my gig, and the budget was low, is hook a scan converter to the output of the laptop, and feed that iso powerpoint video to a DVD recorder. Mixed audio from the podium would also feed to that master iso recording. "
That's what I have in our auditorium, right down to using MPEG Streamclip, and it works a treat.

I think the OP is just being hired as a camera man, with the client wanting to do the editing. Mind you, editing 5 days of presentations would be my idea of hell. Oh, hang on, that's what I'm in the middle of right now...

The way I do these things is to record the presenter (with audio coming in from the house audio system wirelessly via a sony wireless mic with line-in) on tape (don't laugh...) and the PPTs out the back on a DVD recorder. Convert the DVD to Quicktime-DV via MPEG Streamclip. Bring live vision and PPT into FCP. Edit as a multicam project.

If I didn't have a DVD recording to use, I'd go with Vigen's suggestion, and indeed I have seen it done here by outside shooters.

What I'd like to try one day is Presto software which seems to be perfect for this sort of thing. Alternatively, if I was a PC guy, I believe MS make something that hooks into PPT (post production) for doing something similar to Presto.

I know this has come in late and the OP has probably been through whatever conference he had to video, but I'm here watching an MPEG Streamclip progress bar so I thought I'd jump in anyway.


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Vigen KachikeanRe: Need to record video to Digital recorder
by on Jul 13, 2012 at 10:40:12 pm

Hi Greg, i do the same thing i bought a small sony digital camera i think it was 350 it records on SD cards i use FCP to convert files to mov it doesn't take too long it's faster then real time. i Know you have 5 days worth of video, i found this to be the fastest and easiest way then DV. of course there might be other (easier) way to do this i would love too learn what others do.

Vigen Kachikean
Northridge Filmworks
Northridge, CA


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Mark SuszkoRe: Need to record video to Digital recorder
by on Jul 14, 2012 at 12:25:56 am

Forgive me if I come on too strong here, but it is the 21st century and using a camera, shooting off of a screen to re-convert digital data from an analog display, back to an imperfect digital codec, is just ridiculous. Even for only a guide track. Never mind some people use this as actual program source.


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David EaksRe: Need to record video to Digital recorder
by on Aug 16, 2012 at 2:02:32 pm

If all the client wants is a shot of the projector screen, can't you just point any ol digital handycam from Best Buy at the the screen and record on the internal HDD or SD card? Preferably one with dual SD slots so you always have an fresh card ready to go. Or even an iPhone would do, wouldn't it? Just copy the clips to a laptop during the breaks to make room for the next portion.

FWIW, here is my current workflow for recording presenters on stage (HD setup)

Get DVI feed from laptop, either from VGA Distribution Amp and a Geffen VGA to DVI Scaler Plus or the DVI output of the projector.

Panasonic AW-HS50 switcher-
SDI inputs 1 & 2- Sony NX5's (close up and wide shots respectively)
DVI input- Feed from laptop.

Mackie 1402 VLZ3- Podium/lapel mic, audience Q&A mic, ambient mic, house line feed, audio feed from laptop... Etc as necessary.

AJA Ki Pro- Record program output from the switcher, switching live. Record XLR main outs from Mackie. The Ki Pro provides Prores files ready for editing.

Record each camera internally, camera 2 (wide shot) with projector screen in the shot for reference of slide changes. Each camera can also record audio from the mixer, strategically sending crucial mics separately to each cameras inputs allowing the opportunity to alter your audio mix in post as well.

Have the presenter use the mouse cursor instead of a laser pointer, customize the cursor so it is easily visible to the audience if necessary but make sure the pointer does not look rediculous in the live mix (it also keeps the presenter from turning their back towards you as they lean away from the podium to see and point at the screen, and at the same time lowers the risk of them screwing with your audio by distancing themselves from the podium mic or turning their head away from the lapel mic) .

Get the presentation file on a USB stick in case any slides are needed for editing.

Compress for Blu-ray/YouTube with Matrox MAX faster than real time, downscale for DVD with Matrox MXO2/AJA KiPro in real time. Always give the client a Blu-ray as well as the DVD, even if they only ask for DVD... Someday they'll come to see the difference and be glad to have it.

If the live mix is done well, it's pretty much done. Stick some titles on, fine tune any little details and burn/upload. If you need to make changes, you have both cameras and every slide available to you. In the case that I'm not satisfied with my live switch and want to make a lot of changes, I have setup a multicam clip including both of the cameras and the live mix, to easily fix any poorly timed switches in the live mix. Having the wide shot for slide change reference is definitely crucial, but should only be a reference for inserting the slides. Avoid pointing a camera at the projector screen, framing it full-screen and using that shot in the final product.

Shooting presentations with this workflow can give incredible turnaround times, as in the client gets a YouTube of entire lectures for approval the next morning/evening.


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