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Removing footsteps, creaking floorboards, etc. from dialogue recording

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James WinslettRemoving footsteps, creaking floorboards, etc. from dialogue recording
by on May 1, 2012 at 4:06:37 pm

Hi there,

Total noob to sound editing. Our team just got back from a music video shoot in Italy. We're not used to working with sound as we usually just use the audio track the artist provides us and just use the live audio for lip-syncing. This time though, as a bit of fun, we decided to experiment and shoot a short dialogue scene in the bar where we were filming to use at the start of the video. We had one camera for video and a second camera dedicated to capturing the audio - a Canon 550D mounted on a tripod, with a Sennheiser ME66/K6 mic mounted on the hot shoe and we recorded using Magic Lantern to override the camera's automatic gain control. Digital gain was switched off and analog gain set to 32dB.

We made sure to switch off the AC, the fridge, the cappuccino machine, etc. so there's no background hum, but unfortunately while the camera/mic setup captured the dialogue fairly clearly, it captured footsteps, creaking floorboards and cluttering crockery even more clearly and the dialogue gets a bit lost in the mix. I was wondering whether there is anything we can do in post to make the unwanted sounds a bit less dominant and boost the dialogue a little? We'll be using Final Cut Pro 7 and Soundtrack Pro. I'll be adding room tone and trying to cut out as much of the unwanted noise as possible during the breaks in the dialogue, but I've no idea how to tackle the bits where they're talking. Any advice would be much appreciated.

Thanks,

James


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