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Re: have to do a Green Screen project of 15 videos, HDR FX7 or Canon DSLR is the question?

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Craig AlanRe: have to do a Green Screen project of 15 videos, HDR FX7 or Canon DSLR is the question?
by on Jun 9, 2012 at 5:48:34 am

I am the camera operator, the talent, the post AE guy, audio engineer, whole deal.


Not a good recipe for a successful shoot.
At the very least get a camera operator and do an audio check with him wearing headphones.

I need the mic stand because I will be in front of the camera.


The lav will work better under these circumstances. Unless you want to go hand held, but then your hands are not free. You could also go V.O.

Given what you describe I’d go for a wired countryman B6 ear set. Check these out

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/search?Ntt=countryman+eg+earset+wired&N=0&Ini...

The reason I am not loving the T3I is because it lacks autofocus apparently, and the HDR FX7 does a pretty good job at auto focus.


Right the DSLRs are meant for “film” style shooting. Meaning manual everything. If you have a shallow depth of field then you have to manually focus – otherwise how would the camera know what you want in focus?

the T3I as I understand it only has a 13 min recording time for video??


You either need extra media cards or dump them to your computer. 13 min is a long time for any given how-to shot/scene.

The T3I looks nicer than my very expensive video camera so I was interested in purchasing it for item close up and headshot and stuff like that.


Yes the images of DSLRs are impressive due to the large sensors but they have disadvantages: they do not have the features or ergonomics of a video cam. The two are starting to merge into new modular forms like the RED cam. But these still require film style production. Not run and gun.

The DOF on it just makes everything look like movie quality.


Yes the DOF is good, but lighting creates the look, particularly in INT.

I was thinking of trying cinnegamma on the HDRFX7 as I have read that it looks nice. Any experience with that???


I haven’t used that cam though I have used Sony HDV cams (Z7U). But now when I use the z7u I attach it to a KI PRO which records in Apple Pro Res.

So what I am thinking is I will hire this college graphic artist kid to help me set it up or maybe hold one of the boom sticks for mics or what not and I will shoot and star in these things.


Get the kid to shoot. It’s just too limiting to shoot yourself. You can have him stand in for you and you can adjust the exposure, white balance etc. Mount the thing on a tripod and have him slowly follow the action.

Good idea to attach a monitor to your cam so you can really see what you are getting. Broadcast monitors are expensive but a Panasonic plasma with sdi and hdmi inputs are pretty cheap and do a great job.

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/780138-REG/Panasonic_TH_42PH30U_TH_42...

I have keyed before and never really had a problem, but I don’t think I have ever gotten really truly professional results from it.


Spacing and lighting gives you pro results. Avoid green reflections on talent. Avoid shadows on screen. What kind of keyed b.g. are you planning on using?


I have an audio technica 4040 and 3034 and some sm57s and that sort of thing. You think one of those would be better for micing the talent?


If you want to record V.O. style yes. If you are putting these on a boom pole you need a boom operator. Be careful not to throw a shadow on your screen.

Can I use CFL softboxes for the green screen or will thier kelvin rating mess me up due to the PBL lights on the talent being more like 3000k, more orange than blue?


I don’t know about DIY lighting stuff. I use light kits designed by top lighting firms. There are hundreds of articles on-line for the DIYer. I just feel some basic light equipment is a good investment. The stuff will outlast your camera.

If I set up everything and test it do I really need a camera operator, or sound guy present? I was just gonna set this shit iup in a spare bedroom and do it thatr way. Use a camera guy mainly for on the scene interviews and field work.


There are plenty of videos on u-tube shot with computer cams. Most of them look and sound like crap. At the very least if there was no movement at all you still need to frame your shot. I guess if you attached your cam to a monitor facing toward you and used a remote control for zoom and focus and walked back and forth to adjust the tripod until you got it right and then never moved during the shot you could pull it off. But really, why?

Oh, and I have like 200 dollar akg headphones for the studio and a set of lav mics. I just dont like the way lav mics sound and all of the ambiant noise the pic up. I was hoping the shotgun mic, being like omni directional would eliminate some of the room noise and what not. I tent to always get room noise out of standar condesnor mics as well even with a compressor. I am probably not a great audio engineerr but I have been told by recording pros in nashville that I was pretty ok. I just think audio is the evil nemisis of video and want to record it seperatly on the marants pmd660, and try to get a solid fat voice signal. I was thinking of running it through a presonus bluetube mic preamp to fatten it up a bit. Any thoughts?


The closer the mike is to the source the less the back ground noise will interfere with the intended recording. That said there is a reason they say, “quiet on the set!”

A shot gun is not the right mike indoors. The ear set mikes I linked you to get you closer to the source than any other kind of mike save doing VO work with a high end mike designed for that pupose. You might try some sound treatment in your room as well. But you know about recording sessions in the music world. It’s not different for video. Male voices are harder to record. They can be muddy, boomy. Do some tests and set your levels correctly. Use a mixer. I use the High-Pass Filter (Low Cut) Used to reduce excessive low frequencies. 12 dB per octave at 80 Hz. Then experiment with closeness to mouth and angle and of course all the gain settings. On the cam’s meters you want above -12 but not clipping. On a pro mixer above 0 but not clipping. On a pro cam you want to calibrate the mixer so that 0 tone out the mixer records at -20 on cam.

MacPro4,1 2.66GHz 8 core 12gigs of ram. GPU: Nvidia Geoforce GT120 with Vram 512. OS X 10.6.x; Camcorders: Panasonic AG-HPX170, Sony Z7U, Canon HV30/40, Sony vx2000/PD170; FCP 6 certified; write professionally for a variety of media; teach video production in L.A.


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