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Re: see bullet out of gun

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Frank TuckerRe: see bullet out of gun
by on Aug 17, 2007 at 3:56:33 pm

This type of shot (no pun intended) requires significant setup and high speed equipment. A handgun bullet travels between 1000 and 1200 feet per second (avg.) Assuming you are getting an exposed field of view of no more than 3 feet (1 yard) and your frame rate is 30 frames per second. the bullet will have traveled approximately 13 yards within a single frame. The exposure field of view of three feet is at the long end and is most likely not close enough to acquire the detail needed in this type of shot. You would need an intensely bright light pointing away from the camera (at the bullet path to get the reflection off the bullet required for a good image. The light should also be a strobe to insure as still and pristine an image as possible.

If you imagine the speed of the bullet at 1200 fps, you would get a blurry bullet image at a frame rate of 1200 frames per second. The bullet would have traveled 1 foot within the frame. The strobe light will help stop this effect if you can get a high enough frame rate.

A .30 caliber rifle bullet is between 1 and 1.25 inches long. To perfectly stop this image in flight would require approximately 14,000 frames per second. Handgun bullets tend to be shorter (.5 to .75 inches long). A rifle bullet of .30 caliber would travel at between 2500 and 3200 feet per second making this shot even more challenging. You would also need a trigger device to insure the bullet was in front of the camera lens within the timeframe the camera was capable of acquiring this amount of data. Typically, some sort of light switch such as used in a chronograph (device used to measure bullet speed) might work. Also, the photo should occur at some distance from the muzzle (end of barrel) to insure that the muzzle flash and expanding gasses do not interfere with the image. It's a cool trick but can't be done cheap. That's why Hollywood uses special effects and animation.

These are just rough calculations. I could be wrong but there is a lot to consider. If someone else can provide a method that


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Current Message Thread:
  • see bullet out of gun by titan3ium on Aug 17, 2007 at 1:38:22 pm
    • Re: see bullet out of gun by Frank Tucker on Aug 17, 2007 at 3:56:33 pm




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