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Re: Help required for animation workflow

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Rohit IyerRe: Help required for animation workflow
by on Dec 5, 2009 at 11:54:42 am

Hey,

Doesn't hand drawn animation do weird things like draw on "2s" or "1s" or something? Again, quite how this affects a framerate change I'm not sure.

I think it's similar to what you mention later, here:

But just remember they're only decimal when talking in a "per second" rate. As in, there's not a .976th of a frame

I think the same applies when I'm using TV Paint - it distributes frames so that the average is 23.976 per second, as you mentioned.

Of course, since I'm drawing frame-by-frame or every other frame (2's), this can get a bit confusing where a round number like 24/25 makes it easier to wrap one's head around. Plus 24 is the classic number that animators always use.

all original 24fps film when scanned in is slowed down to 23.976, then the pulldown is applied

Does this mean that in the film-out the film is sped back up to true 24 frames/sec? Doesn't this imply that a 24 fps source can always be changed to 23.976 or 25 fps or 29.97 fps afterward with audio adjustments?

I mean if everything is interchangeable in the end, does it really make a difference?

I think this is what is bugging me most. All around the internet people are using 24p and 23.976 fps interchangeably, so it's hard to know which one is being referred to.

Also I read about 24p and DVDs on Wikipedia:

24p on DVD
DVDs, however, are capable of storing the native 24p frames. Every Hollywood movie is laid to disc as a 24p (actually 23.976p – see below) stream. With a progressive-scan DVD player and a progressive display, such as an HDTV, only the progressive frames are displayed and there is no conversion to an interlaced format – eliminating the appearance of any interlace or de-interlacing artifacts. When displayed on a standard NTSC TV (which only display 60i) the DVD player will add 3:2 pulldown to the signal.


This does imply that 23.976 is the most future-proof. Also do you think this means that for PAL DVDs, the player would adjust the frame-rate, etc. on its own? I think I need to do more research on how DVDs work as well. Perhaps there might not be a need to conform to 25fps manually just to make a PAL DVD?

I hope I'm not boring you with these observations. I'm just really enjoying this thread!

-Rohit


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