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Video & Film to DVD hardware?

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Dave FickasVideo & Film to DVD hardware?
by on Oct 10, 2002 at 12:11:01 am

I currently xfer FROM:VHS,8mm,Hi8,S-VHS TO:MiniDV,VHS,S-VHS and FROM:8mm/16mm film TO:MiniDV,VHS,S-VHS. I want to transfer these formats to DVD-R for my customers. I'd like to use a set-top DVD burner like the Pioneer PRV-9000/DVR-7000 or Panasonic HS-2. For telecine I'm considering an interface HD Drive controller like the Focus Enhancements FireStore. My proposed work flow: 8mm/16mm film>MiniDV Camera>DV Mixer>FireStore>Set-top DVD Burner. Please advise me!


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Noah KadnerRe: Video & Film to DVD hardware?
by on Oct 10, 2002 at 6:26:54 am

Why the firestore- you can go directly from MiniDV to MPEG-2 with Procoder.

Noah


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Dave FickasRe: Video & Film to DVD hardware?
by on Oct 10, 2002 at 5:53:15 pm

Noah, The FireStore would allow me to do "cuts only" editing (a must when using film sources) prior to going to MPEG-2 with the set-top recorder. I'm not familiar with the Procoder. What is it?


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Noah KadnerRe: Video & Film to DVD hardware?
by on Oct 10, 2002 at 6:05:31 pm

Why not just get a big hard drive and do DV editing on your PC? I was under the impression the Firestore was meant for field use not studio. Procoder is an MPEG-2 encoder- which you need to convert from DV to DVD.

Noah


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Dave FickasRe: Video & Film to DVD hardware?
by on Oct 10, 2002 at 6:11:05 pm

Noah, Using my PC just seemed like it would be more complicated and less time efficient. Is the Procoder software or hardware?


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Noah KadnerRe: Video & Film to DVD hardware?
by on Oct 10, 2002 at 8:47:46 pm

Procoder is a software encoder that enocodes from DV clips. Here is the link:

http://www.canopus.com/US/products/procoder/pm_procoder.asp

There are many other encoders- both hardware and software. So you need to identify your budget first and then decide what is most important- speed, quality, etc.

Firestore is meant to replace or supplement tape in the field. In a studio it would simply be a very expensive hard drive- the process of using it would be no different from digitizing into your PC.

Noah


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Dave FickasRe: Video & Film to DVD hardware?
by on Oct 10, 2002 at 11:00:18 pm

Noah,

Thanks for the info.

Dave


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davidisraelDVD burners
by on Oct 11, 2002 at 2:09:33 am

<< DVD burner like the Pioneer PRV-9000/DVR-7000 or Panasonic HS-2. >>

Dave,

another issue or question mark about the workflow you sketch concerns the above. If you go the route Noah (I think rightly) suggests, really in that case you would want to install a DVD-R/RW drive (such as the Pioneer A03 or A04) rather than using those stand-alone DVD burners you mention. The latter have one advantage -- they're fast. They have several disadvantages: (1) they generate very primitive (1950s-jukebox-style) menus at best; also, they have their own internal MPEG2 encoder that's not at all as flexible and sophisticated as (e.g.) ProCoder or other mid-level encoding solutions; I think they simply have a choice of fixed bitrates . . .

I think the only poss. advantage to the workflow you describe (using standalone burner) would involve real-quick turnaround time (and in fact you could, in principle, do what you propose without having to have a robust enough computer to handle video/DVD things; but if you're serious about this as a line of work, and can afford the gear you describe, perhaps you're better off doing this more properly with a computer fitted out to the task). Indeed as Noah notes, FireStore is quite costly for the amount of storage. If you get say a 160-gb harddrive or two, you can store a lot of projects and can fine-tune things for your clients in all sorts of ways.

just a few added stray thoughts for what worth.

cheers,
d.i.

david raphael israel
other shore dvd
washington, dc
davidi@wizard.net


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Terry WoolseyRe: DVD burners
by on Oct 11, 2002 at 6:00:59 pm

I disagree with the quick turnaround on the Pioneer DVD standalone recorders. Remember, you need to manually enter the text for each title of each track for each DVD you record. And you do this with a stupid little joy-stick hand held controller. This gets real old real fast, if your recording many DVDs.

I would rather put my time into creating a nice Photoshop menu while the software encoding is running and only create titles once. And, I would rather spend 45min burning a 2hour DVD then to spend 3hours titling and recording a standalong DVD.

I have a Pioneer PVR-9000 and only use it for a single source dump for someone to look at in a DVD player. I wouldn't recommend it to anyone.

Have a good day.


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Dave FickasRe: DVD burners
by on Oct 12, 2002 at 11:27:42 pm

Terry,

I appreciate your input. I'd like to present a couple of particular scenarios for what I see as (possibly) efficent useage of the PRV-9000 in my video transfer studio--as opposed to authoring on a computer as you and others have suggested.

Situation #1: Customer asks to have a VHS tape transferred to DVD-R. They're not concerned with fancy titles, menus or particular chapter points, just a basic opening title followed by the video content (which runs continuously for up to 120 minutes). I create the opening title (within the PRV-9000) and burn the VHS content to disc.

Situation #2: Cutomer wants their 8mm Film transferred to DVD-R. Once again they're not concerned with fancy titles, menus and such. They would like an opening title and say 4 titles--each appearing just before a particular reel of film. I transfer the footage to MiniDV or DVCam tape,use my Character Generator to insert the titles, then transfer the finished tape to the PRV-9000 and burn the DVD-R in one recording session.

Would the above scenarios--in your opinion--constitute efficient usage of the PRV-9000--"stupid little joystick controller" not withstanding?

Dave Fickas


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Terry WoolseyRe: DVD burners
by on Oct 14, 2002 at 5:28:21 pm

Yes, your two situations would be similar to a source dump. I have put 12 to 16 tracks on the PVR-9000 recorder. Labeling those track titles with a joy stick gets old. For a single track the recorder will give you a track title with a date stamp.

The PVR-9000 costs $2K and I don't see any advantages over the $700 Panasonic.

Have a good day.


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Dave FickasRe: DVD burners
by on Oct 14, 2002 at 8:40:22 pm

Terry,

Thanks for the additional info. To me the advantage of the
PRV-9000 (current Los Angeles area price is $1694) over the Panasonic ($700) seems to be that it's an industrial quality unit rather than a consumer unit. I'd rather pay more money and get something that's more durable.

Thanks,
Dave Fickas


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John K JordanRe: DVD burners
by on Oct 24, 2002 at 3:29:24 pm

Dave,

I use the PRV-9000 and it has BNC connectors instead of RCA. I was told that is the biggest difference between it and the cheaper unit but I don't know that for a fact. I guess I'd be surprised if they built one to be more durable than the other with respect to motors, loading mechanisms, and lasers. Perhaps the 9000 has better electronics?

I do exactly what you mentioned for quick DVDs - crash record to DVD-R and edit the title names with the stupid little joystick only if necessary. These DVDs work just like a tape - they start playing the video when the Play button is pressed - they don't go to the menu unless you press the Menu button. If I need several copies or better looking menu, I use a ripper to extract the VOB and demux to MPEG and AC3 files, add menus in ReelDVD, and burn back to DVD-R with RecordNow DX that came with the Pioneer A04 burner. This method will not work with an authoring program (such as DVDit LE/SE) that does not accept AC3 audio files, unless there is a way I don't know about to convert AC3 to WAV or some other format.

This method works well and is pretty fast due to the real-time MPGE encoder built into the PRV-9000. The downside is as others mentioned - you trade speed for quality. I've seen some encoding artifacts in fast moving scenes. As expected, this is worse in the 120 minute recording mode than it is in the 60 minute mode. However, it sure beats VHS tape! Material recorded from VHS actually played back at a higher quality than the original VHS, presumably due to the better video connections (component vs composite) on my DVD player. Material recorded from betacamSP and DV was excellent.

Another possible problem - DVD-Rs recorded rather than burned seem to be pickier as to the media used. For example, disks recorded onto Imation, CompUSA, TDK, Samsung, and earlier Pioneer disks would NOT play proply in several consumer players. Some of these disks worked OK until they were left in the player for an hour or so and heated up (felt pleny warm to the touch) Maxell, Memorex, Apple, and the newer Pioneer media worked perfectly.

Some media which would not work in the 9000 did work OK with the A04. This suggests to me that DVD-Rs created with a burner may be more robust than those made with the recorder, but I have no solid tests to prove or disprove this.

JKJ


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